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Broken shapes floating in my head.

Rualani

You Silly Willy
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Thinking back upon my past, I had a period in high school where, occasionally, I would try to rotate or think about shapes in my head. Whenever I would do this, it would loop rather annoyingly and, also, appear broken. It was like an incomplete picture trying to complete itself indefinitely. What in the world was all that about.

My brief speculation says that being able to properly visualize a scene is something to practice. Roommate was a designer major and he said that most people have to learn how to remember a visual image properly when designing something and that it takes practice. Could this practice of imagery recall be related to that horrific undefinable floating shape in the sky that keeps turning?
 

bvanevery

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"Looping" sounds to me like you might have a lot of media training as to how you perceive things, i.e. lots of YouTube. This is noticeable to me because I come from a pre-YouTube, even pre web browser generation of internet use. It was such an odd concept to me, "Why would you visualize any 3d shape as 'looping' ?" that I figured, you must have been trained by your environment to regard things that way. I can't imagine it occurring naturally.

Maybe brokenness is related to the looping. An idea about something not working.
 

Hadoblado

think again losers
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I can't imagine it occurring naturally.
I can. Ever had a song stuck in your head? Replace auditory info with visual and you have this loop.

Why, when you have a song stuck in your head, do you loop one part (such as the chorus), instead of completing the whole song and then move on (like I desperately wish would happen)? Well, you're looping the song, but you're not necessarily making the decision to do so. If you're not deciding to loop the song, then what is? Level of synaptic connectivity. Since popular songs are sort of designed so that the pieces easily lead back into themselves, at a certain point through the song, the synapses are more prompted by themselves (availability bias) than they are by the rest of the song, and the collapse starting over instead of proceeding to completion.

Visualization could easily work the same. Generating new images is more difficult for the brain than remembering old ones. So when you visualise a cube and rotate it 270 degrees, your brain has the necessary image for 360 very available to it, and also sort of wants to use the shortcut for efficiency purposes. This might explain why is feels broken, because the last part of the process is being hijacked by another similar process.

Of course, this is just a guess. I do think a sociological explanation with youtube is a bit of a stretch, especially given we've had looping screen savers for far longer.

Edit:
Thread split to: here.This remains the floating shapes thread, the new thread is on all things earworm.
 

bvanevery

Redshirt who doesn't die
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Going back to the original topic of the thread, there's a related literature on visual hallucinatory phenomena. I didn't look into that at all and will leave it totally to someone else. I will stand by my claim that seeing geometric shapes "loop" in one's mind, sounds a lot like too much time with internet or computer media inputs. Like I might expect it of someone who does a lot of CAD/CAM work perhaps? Anyways I bet you won't find answers to such a question just doing a quick look for the 1st claim on the internet you run into. I've demonstrated how sparsely studied the earworm phenomenon is, for instance, and the researchers called out the claims of other researchers as not grounded in science.
:cat:
 
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