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INTP Backpacker

Shu

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A couple days ago I was on some MBTI page and it had a list of things each personality type should do to grow. For INTPs it recommended to travel. I am an INTP and I have some experience in this area. I'm normally not into sharing stuff like this unless people ask, but this forum seems to be a pretty open place for sharing your thoughts.

Back in 2013 my friend was me visiting from out of town. After talking with him for about 20 minutes he just randomly said "Hey, I'm going to Costa Rica in a few months, do you want to go?". Without really thinking about it or asking any questions I said "sure". Oddly enough, every once in a blue moon I find one I those "Fuck it.. Why not?"' moods, and he caught me right in the middle of one. Is that just a me thing or is that normal for an INTP?

Over the next few weeks, I started researching hotels and sent him some links. His reply was something like "No dude, we are not gonna goto hotels or resorts. It's hostels and buses for us. We are backpacking" Up until that moment, backpacking meant going into the woods and sleeping in tents (I'm showing my Missouri roots here) and hostels were places where people got murdered and had their organs harvested.

In the end, my friend and I ended up going to like 8 cities in Panama and Costa Rica. After that trip, I was completely hooked on backpacking. So hooked that as soon as I got my first paycheck after the trip, I bought a ticket to Cancun and a return flight from San Pedro Sula in Honduras for 4 months later. When buying the ticket I assumed I could talk at least one of my friends or family into going. I ended up going alone which was the best thing that could have happened to me.

I know there is an endless supply of articles (sponsored content) online about traveling and it benefits. I haven't found anything that pertains specifically to INTPs. Actually, most of those articles get my eyes rolling. When I see a headline like "How traveling the world made me a better person" what I as an INTP really see is "How traveling the world made it socially acceptable for me to publicly imply that I'm better than everybody else".

It is hard to put into words why I think it is so good for an INTP to travel but I wil try my best. When you travel, there is a seemingly endless supply of mental stimulation. All you have to do is walk around a new place for an hour or two by yourself. As an INTP you are absorbing all this data about the new culture which then of course you get to analyze and expand knowledge upon for much time to come. You are figuratively that kid in a candy store who wants to try everything. When you are traveling you can be whoever you want to be (most likely you will never see these people again) so you can experiment. You can say those quirky things you normally wouldn't say to strangers at home without worrying about running into them again. The world becomes your psychological laboratory. Also, you meet a wide variety of personalities completely different to the ones you know at home and they love having their brain picked. There are no rules of traveling, just guidelines which you can chose to follow if you wish. I rarely run into INTPs in my travels, but you meet a lot more people that appreciate and are intrigued by us.

I know many people have preconceived notions that it is expensive. I thought this as well but I found that it is not at all. There is a lot to learn about how to do it cheap, but once you do the research and go on a few backpack trips you quickly learn to be an expert at stretching that dollar. I warn you it is extremely addictive. So much so that 6 months after the second backpack trip, I sold most of my shit, got a plane ticket and left the USA with about 3k in my pocket to travel the world for the rest of my life. That was over 16 months ago.

Before all this I was completely miserable. I couldn't find any meaning in life. I felt like I was Neo, endlessly searching for something and had no idea what it was. It's like I have escaped the matrix and have found a true means to happiness and fulfillment. I wanted to share this because I have got the feeling from reading through these forums and watching INTPs in YouTube that others have that Neo feeling in life. Maybe this could bring the same satisfaction for you guys like it did for me.

If this is something that truly interests you guys, I would be more than happy to answer any of the million questions I'm sure you have.

Also would like to hear comments or feedback as well. Thanks for listening to me ramble you guys
 

Jennywocky

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Back in 2013 my friend was me visiting from out of town. After talking with him for about 20 minutes he just randomly said "Hey, I'm going to Costa Rica in a few months, do you want to go?". Without really thinking about it or asking any questions I said "sure". Oddly enough, every once in a blue moon I find one I those "Fuck it.. Why not?"' moods, and he caught me right in the middle of one. Is that just a me thing or is that normal for an INTP?
That actually sounds kind of like me -- when I'm on my own (i.e., don't have kids and debt I need to have money to take care of) and if I have open time. I do it a lot with smaller stuff; something will come up out of the blue and if it sounds cool / possibilities, I'll find myself suddenly excited about it and want to jump in.

I know there is an endless supply of articles (sponsored content) online about traveling and it benefits. I haven't found anything that pertains specifically to INTPs. Actually, most of those articles get my eyes rolling. When I see a headline like "How traveling the world made me a better person" what I as an INTP really see is "How traveling the world made it socially acceptable for me to publicly imply that I'm better than everybody else".
yeah, a LOT of people (and MBTI types of people) claim to enjoy traveling / have it as an aspiration, but i suspect the notion of how to travel and what it means for them differs from person to person. I'd rather see all the stuff off the beaten path, explore on my own, and engage with people if I can, versus just seeing a bunch of tourist attractions and staying in ritzy hotels.

It is hard to put into words why I think it is so good for an INTP to travel but I wil try my best. When you travel, there is a seemingly endless supply of mental stimulation. All you have to do is walk around a new place for an hour or two by yourself. As an INTP you are absorbing all this data about the new culture which then of course you get to analyze and expand knowledge upon for much time to come. You are figuratively that kid in a candy store who wants to try everything. When you are traveling you can be whoever you want to be (most likely you will never see these people again) so you can experiment. You can say those quirky things you normally wouldn't say to strangers at home without worrying about running into them again. The world becomes your psychological laboratory. Also, you meet a wide variety of personalities completely different to the ones you know at home and they love having their brain picked. There are no rules of traveling, just guidelines which you can chose to follow if you wish. I rarely run into INTPs in my travels, but you meet a lot more people that appreciate and are intrigued by us.
That all sounds accurate and interesting to me. "The road goes ever ever on" thing... some days I fantasize about just locking my front door, grabbing a bag, and just walking. And walking. And walking on and never coming back. Because i want to see what's out there. When I was young, I would spend summers just riding my bike down new roads (back roads) and exploring...

I know many people have preconceived notions that it is expensive. I thought this as well but I found that it is not at all. There is a lot to learn about how to do it cheap, but once you do the research and go on a few backpack trips you quickly learn to be an expert at stretching that dollar.
My INTP kid, when he was 18, got an offer from his ENTP friend to just go and bum around Mexico for a month. Unfortunately, the ENTP didn't plan well and ended up using my kid's money to live off, so my son lost money on that deal. But it's the same concept; I bet on a second outing, he could stretch that money a lot more now that he has a feel for what it's like down there.

I warn you it is extremely addictive. So much so that 6 months after the second backpack trip, I sold most of my shit, got a plane ticket and left the USA with about 3k in my pocket to travel the world for the rest of my life. That was over 16 months ago.
So here's the most obvious question. Where'd you go over the last sixteen months? Where are you now? What's the coolest thing(s) you've seen in that time, or places you've been?
 

Sinny91

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"Fuck it.. Why not?"' moods, and he caught me right in the middle of one. Is that just a me thing or is that normal for an INTP?
My life story.


Over the next few weeks, I started researching hotels and sent him some links. His reply was something like "No dude, we are not gonna goto hotels or resorts. It's hostels and buses for us. We are backpacking" Up until that moment, backpacking meant going into the woods and sleeping in tents (I'm showing my Missouri roots here) and hostels were places where people got murdered and had their organs harvested.
Back in my college days a friend offered me to join her for a backing packing round the world trip; she advised we'd both just need to work and save for the year, and if we stuck to controlled budgeting plans we could make it work.
Yea well, the terms 'me', 'control' and 'budget' don't really go hand in hand; consequently I never managed to join her on that trip, and I regret it to this day. I think she managed to get about 3k together, the round the world ticket cost 1k, and they just worked for their accomodation & food throughout their travels. Sounded fooking amazeballs, she went so many places, and did so many things.

In the end, my friend and I ended up going to like 8 cities in Panama and Costa Rica. After that trip, I was completely hooked on backpacking. So hooked that as soon as I got my first paycheck after the trip, I bought a ticket to Cancun and a return flight from San Pedro Sula in Honduras for 4 months later. When buying the ticket I assumed I could talk at least one of my friends or family into going. I ended up going alone which was the best thing that could have happened to me.
Yea, I imagine I will really enjoy travelling - a part of me fears that I'll never want to come back home. There's many aspects of home that I'll never miss, but one of the things I will miss will be my best friend, I'm not sure how i'd function without him. He said he'd come on some trips with me, but I'm not convinced he's as adventurous as I'd like to be.

Anyway, I'm getting restless and the time is near. I hope to be saved up and ready to dissappear for a good long while in about 2018, perhaps. I just know that I've set myself a deadline to cram a lot of stuff in before 30.

It is hard to put into words why I think it is so good for an INTP to travel but I wil try my best. When you travel, there is a seemingly endless supply of mental stimulation. All you have to do is walk around a new place for an hour or two by yourself. As an INTP you are absorbing all this data about the new culture which then of course you get to analyze and expand knowledge upon for much time to come. You are figuratively that kid in a candy store who wants to try everything.
Yup, this.

Also, you meet a wide variety of personalities completely different to the ones you know at home and they love having their brain picked. There are no rules of traveling, just guidelines which you can chose to follow if you wish. I rarely run into INTPs in my travels, but you meet a lot more people that appreciate and are intrigued by us.
I have a good number of friends whom I met online over the years who would be more than happy to aid me in my travels too - from all over the States, to the Netherlands. (Not entirely sure I'd make it past the TSA though)

I know many people have preconceived notions that it is expensive.

I thought this as well but I found that it is not at all. There is a lot to learn about how to do it cheap, but once you do the research and go on a few backpack trips you quickly learn to be an expert at stretching that dollar. I warn you it is extremely addictive. So much so that 6 months after the second backpack trip, I sold most of my shit, got a plane ticket and left the USA with about 3k in my pocket to travel the world for the rest of my life. That was over 16 months ago.

Before all this I was completely miserable. I couldn't find any meaning in life. I felt like I was Neo, endlessly searching for something and had no idea what it was. It's like I have escaped the matrix and have found a true means to happiness and fulfillment. I wanted to share this because I have got the feeling from reading through these forums and watching INTPs in YouTube that others have that Neo feeling in life. Maybe this could bring the same satisfaction for you guys like it did for me.

If this is something that truly interests you guys, I would be more than happy to answer any of the million questions I'm sure you have.

Also would like to hear comments or feedback as well. Thanks for listening to me ramble you guys
Awesome thread topic, thanks for sharing.
 

Shu

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So here's the most obvious question. Where'd you go over the last sixteen months? Where are you now? What's the coolest thing(s) you've seen in that time, or places you've been?
I flew to Brisbane Australia for a few days. Went up to Cairns and worked for a company called Ace which is kinda like Hertz in USA for a few months. I took a road trip down the coast after 3 months to Sydney for New Years. That pretty much killed my savings so I went to a town called Mildura and worked on a Vineyard for a couple months. After that I checked out Adelaide and Darwin. From Darwin I went back to Cairns for an Internship to become a Scuba Divemaster.

After Australia I flew to Indonesia where I went to Bali, Lombok, Komodo, and a bunch of small islands. Not sure if they have names or not.

Flew to Singapore for a few days then I backpacker around Malaysia, Cambodia and Thailand. Currently I live in Khao Lak Thailand, from the movie "The Impossible" (didn't know that until after I moved here). I work as a freelance divemaster, guiding certified divers in the Similan Islands.

It's really hard to pin down the coolest things I've seen. Your mindset on what you want to get out of travel changes over time. First I believe I was seeking to discover and experience the unknown. It requires to find the off the beaten path things like you were talking about. Cairns was sooo incredible for this mindset. Sooo many hidden waterfalls, trails through the jungle and mountains to climb. It was also a town full of world travelers as well. There are many very interesting people to talk to, and many appreciate how an INTP can just up and listen to what they have to say.

One of my favorite stories is last year I arrived at my hostel in Georgetown Malaysia. When I walked in nobody was at reception, so I walked upstairs. At the top of the stairs I was greeted by a Malaysia man named Sam playing a guitar hanging out with three beautiful women. He invited me to sit down, gave me a beer and a cigarette and asked me about my travels. After talking for about two minutes he said "You should come to my island Langkawi. You can train Muay Thai and alcohol is super cheap because the island is duty free". I told him it sounded great. He had to go back to his island the next day because he owned a restaurant and apparently the freezer broke. I still wanted to explore the island of Penang so I ended up spending the next few days with the 3 girls: Kelly from Australia, Bianca from South Africa and Sophie from Sweeden. After about four days on Penang, Sophie and I took a boat to Langkawi. Sam let us stay at his place for free and we did one week of Muay Thai training at his gym. Too many good stories to tell came from exploring Langkawi and training. When I am traveling without an agenda or a plan, these are the type of things I am looking for. Sometimes you strike out for a week or two but you know the next crazy adventure is coming and it's going to be great.
 

Shu

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My life story.




Yea, I imagine I will really enjoy travelling - a part of me fears that I'll never want to come back home. There's many aspects of home that I'll never miss, but one of the things I will miss will be my best friend, I'm not sure how i'd function without him. He said he'd come on some trips with me, but I'm not convinced he's as adventurous as I'd like to be.

Anyway, I'm getting restless and the time is near. I hope to be saved up and ready to dissappear for a good long while in about 2018, perhaps. I just know that I've set myself a deadline to cram a lot of stuff in before 30.
I'll tell you it is very hard to convince people to join you on things like this. We live in a time where people let fear rule their lives. I get a lot of people saying they will go but then something "comes up" and they have to cancel. People nowadays love to share their motivational speeches they found on TED's youtube channels or motivational memes. To me, all I see these accomplish is the people watching them get to feel warm and fuzzy for a few minutes, then go back to their cat videos (I am in no way saying there is anything wrong with a good cat video online).

The best piece of advice or motivational words I can give anybody is "Just buy that damn plane ticket". Once you buy you ticket the adventure begins. It's real. It's official. You have to go now. Buying the plane ticket gives you complete focus on planning for your adventure. It's easy to turn down your friends to go out to the bars and waste money you need for your trip. You walk right past that gadget 'you have to have' at best buy without a thought. All you can think of is the adventure to come and you find a way to make it work no matter what.

Thanks for reading. It was my first post like this ever online and I really appreciate the feedback.
 

Helvete

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Hi Shu, welcome. I like your story and enjoy some of your insights. I sm also a backpacker. I left England for south east Asia 11 months ago and am now exploring Australia. If you like you can share a story in my travelling thread, I'm on my phone so can't be bothered to link it (sorry). I may reply with more once I get my laptop out, which admittedly I've found myself using less and less. I'm suffering the exhausting heat and humidity of Cain's right now and the added heat of any source will be avoided at all costs...
 

Shu

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Hi Shu, welcome. I like your story and enjoy some of your insights. I sm also a backpacker. I left England for south east Asia 11 months ago and am now exploring Australia. If you like you can share a story in my travelling thread, I'm on my phone so can't be bothered to link it (sorry). I may reply with more once I get my laptop out, which admittedly I've found myself using less and less. I'm suffering the exhausting heat and humidity of Cain's right now and the added heat of any source will be avoided at all costs...
Great to hear from another backpacker INTP. I have many recommendations for Cairns if you would like. My favorite place was Behana Gorge. Most beautiful place I've seen and there is a really fun cliff to jump off of. If you would like I can forward you a long list of great things to do around Cairns.
 

EditorOne

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Great original posting, Shu.

I think one of the attractions of picking up and going is the chance to deploy and prove our ability to solve any problem, any where, any time. I know we don't all have that trait to the same degree, but it sounds like you do.
 

Alias

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Welcome! As an INTP, I'd have to say I love traveling. Been to Argentina countless times. Buenos Aires is such an appealing city, with its architecture, culture and history. I recently fell in love with New Orleans. The voodoo shops are interesting, the jazz is excellent, quite a few people you'll meet are friendly, and it's historically significant. I loved going to the bar where Andrew Jackson hired pirates to fight the British.

Language is another important factor. I'm already bilingual (Spanish & English), and I'm learning German. Language is really fun for me to learn. I hope to visit Germany in some years. On my list is Australia. The wilderness of it is amazing, the atmosphere seems really cool, and I don't have to learn a completely new language.

If you do it right, traveling is outrageously fulfilling.
 

Shu

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Great original posting, Shu.

I think one of the attractions of picking up and going is the chance to deploy and prove our ability to solve any problem, any where, any time. I know we don't all have that trait to the same degree, but it sounds like you do.
Thanks man. Yeah that's an interesting way to think about it I haven't thought of before. I did find it fulfilling when I first move to Australia that within a month I was able to completely start a whole new life from almost nothing. I got a good job, made a lot of friends (a few that will be lifelong close friends) and really became a part of the community. I think that falls in line with what you are talking about.
 

Shu

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Welcome! As an INTP, I'd have to say I love traveling. Been to Argentina countless times. Buenos Aires is such an appealing city, with its architecture, culture and history. I recently fell in love with New Orleans. The voodoo shops are interesting, the jazz is excellent, quite a few people you'll meet are friendly, and it's historically significant. I loved going to the bar where Andrew Jackson hired pirates to fight the British.

Language is another important factor. I'm already bilingual (Spanish & English), and I'm learning German. Language is really fun for me to learn. I hope to visit Germany in some years. On my list is Australia. The wilderness of it is amazing, the atmosphere seems really cool, and I don't have to learn a completely new language.

If you do it right, traveling is outrageously fulfilling.
Thanks man. My roommate Bruno is from Argentina and it sounds really nice. It's really interesting to hear about all their current politics with the change in government. Chile is near the top of my list as well. I have learned a little bit of Spanish and quite a bit of French. I'm not fluent in either, but I feel like I will have to be submerged in the language for around 6 months to really speak fluently. It was funny to me to hear that INTPs have a strong interest in foreign language since I have always had an interest in it. My two favorite methods of learning are listening to Michele Thomas and Pimsleur.

Australia is very beautiful. The culture is quite a bit like American. They are just a lot more laid back and their version of the "red neck" country culture really bleeds into their city culture as well which is cool.
 

Happy

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Australia is very beautiful. The culture is quite a bit like American. They are just a lot more laid back and their version of the "red neck" country culture really bleeds into their city culture as well which is cool.
Interesting observation, I guess it's partly true, but there is quite a distinction between our city and outback cultures. BTW, our version of 'redneck' is called 'bogan'. There are country bogans and city bogans. They are similar, but remarkably different. If you're interested, theres a neat documentary by VICE that exhibits true country bogans: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUg-8NWRk98 This is a real thing and quite popular where I grew up. AFAIK this doesn't exist in the cities.
 

onesteptwostep

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I'm curious, do you ever feel like you want to rather settle down and start a career?

I've haven't being traveling all my life, but I've generally moved a lot, so the whole bouncing from one place to another sort of isn't my thing, basically I'm sick and tired. Wouldn't settling down be more of a rational choice for the future? I guess this is more of an Ti approach to it. I mean the question of marriage is going to pop up sooner or later and the need to find a stable job somewhere. Is your family okay with this as well? How do they view it?
 

Alias

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Chile is near the top of my list as well. I have learned a little bit of Spanish and quite a bit of French. I'm not fluent in either, but I feel like I will have to be submerged in the language for around 6 months to really speak fluently. It was funny to me to hear that INTPs have a strong interest in foreign language since I have always had an interest in it. My two favorite methods of learning are listening to Michele Thomas and Pimsleur.
I have a friend who's going to Chile in about two weeks. When you learn one Romance Language, it's easier to understand the others, so Spanish and French should go hand in hand a little. I use an online program called Mango Languages for German. I'm assuming it's similar to Pimsleur.com.

I really do like language learning. There's just something inherently fun in the grammar structure, the sound, and everything. I'm really good at pronouncing things like a native, instead of having an obvious English-speaker accent.
 

Shu

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I'm curious, do you ever feel like you want to rather settle down and start a career?

I've haven't being traveling all my life, but I've generally moved a lot, so the whole bouncing from one place to another sort of isn't my thing, basically I'm sick and tired. Wouldn't settling down be more of a rational choice for the future? I guess this is more of an Ti approach to it. I mean the question of marriage is going to pop up sooner or later and the need to find a stable job somewhere. Is your family okay with this as well? How do they view it?
Well first off I'm not, I'm not trying to advocate for people to drop everything and leave their homes for good. I'm just giving a new perspective to those who haven't thought about doing a bit of backpacking in their time off.

For me, I become bored of routine. I find myself going more into that "autopilot" mode and end up just living completely in my head. This is what happen to me when I settle down in one spot and focus on a career. The constant stimulation of traveling brings me more into the present moment which helps me appreciate life more.

As far as marriage, I'm not interested in it at all right now and I may never be. It is possible I will change my mind someday and for me it seems almost easier to have a successful marriage while traveling. I meet many women who are living the same lifestyle as me who would be more compatible than the women I meet back home who are settled. In fact, I get girls who jokingly propose to me when I tell them about my plans to buy a sailboat in the next 5 years and start a business from the boat I live on. I can see myself having great relationships in the future, I just don't know how I would fair in something permanent. After all, INTPs are among the highest most likely to get married and divorced. "We're a generation of men raised by women... I'm wondering if another woman is the answer we really need"

As far as my family back home, my immediate family doesn't support it. My mom and dad want me to come back home. I grew up in a family of extroverts and so I don't think they ever really understood me. When I was young, I think had the desire to travel and adventure but my dad always steered me in the direction of a more practical life. Get a job that pays a lot so you can buy a nice house and fill it with nice things. Find a wife so you can fall in love and have children. I bought into this for a while and had a career for 5 years and was moving up the ladder. The more I would get paid the more miserable I became because "wasn't this supposed to make me happy?". I spent about a decade living a life of dogma that was full of dead ends so I don't think I owe anything to anybody anymore. I don't resent my parents for it. They had my happiness in mind when trying to push me in "the right direction" and wanted what they thought was right for me. It's Just in the end, they didn't understand me (hell sometimes I don't understand myself) and were wrong.
 

Shu

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I have a friend who's going to Chile in about two weeks. When you learn one Romance Language, it's easier to understand the others, so Spanish and French should go hand in hand a little. I use an online program called Mango Languages for German. I'm assuming it's similar to Pimsleur.com.

I really do like language learning. There's just something inherently fun in the grammar structure, the sound, and everything. I'm really good at pronouncing things like a native, instead of having an obvious English-speaker accent.
Nice, I will have to.check that program out. I'm planning to backpack Europe in a couple years for maybe 6 months. I've made so many friends from Europe and in a couple of years should be able to travel through the continent and have a place to stay in most countries. I am thinking about working on a farm for food and accommodation for a few months in France just so I can learn the language. I worked on a Vineyard in Australia for a couple of months, and there was this guy from Belgium who was learning English that way and he was picking it up very quickly.
 

onesteptwostep

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Thank you for your reply. It's ways interesting to hear from people who've gone through these things themselves.

I've been to Chang Mai in Thailand... I didn't really like it myself but I could see how someone could enjoy it there. Anyway thanks again, and welcome to the forum ^^
 

Analyzer

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Cool post, thanks for posting. I'm all down with this lifestyle just need to figure out a way to make it practical, meaning making enough money somehow. Looks you have just found work where ever you went, very interesting. Most nomads and the like usually have some form of online enterprise they do.
 
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