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Gnurp

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Heya folks,

I'm lucky enough to have stumbled upon MBTI typing a couple years ago and have found the knowledge very helpful. Realizing that I really am part of a common human experience, and not a just a uniquely selfish, dysfunctional, person - well it was a game changer.

I'm happy to report:

  • It gets easier to manage mundane, routine tasks.
  • Some good personal habits do end up sticking.
  • We make great parents, and produce great kids. :)
  • We just keep learnin...
 

peoplesuck

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Welcome! Everyone here is fairly knowledgable and polite, Im about as bad as it gets on this forum. :p
Care to share what your hobbies/ interests are?
 

Gnurp

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Well lets see, I've got a few small parrots that I'm currently loving/studying... They've kept me fascinated for years now...

I'm a techy guy and dad and gamer, so most of my other hobbies revolve around that. And I teach kids to code, which is great because everyone once in a while I get to coach itty bitty (probably) INTPs with their crazed, worried parents, which is strangely cathartic to witness and to... deescalate...
 

Kormak

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Welcome, welcome >D
Good to see someone who is a father. Congratualtions.

4714
 

Perfectly Normal Beast

you know the game
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42 is a lie. i've been excitedly awaiting my secret memo for months alas to no avail : /

welcome etc
 

scorpiomover

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Inexorable Username

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Good to hear that mundane tasks become easier! I have a terrible habit.
I do 20 minutes of mundane tasks, then I sit on my bed for “a min” to pick out a new song, and before I know it I’ve been there for 45 minutes wondering about things, looking things up, or watching educational YouTube videos @_@
Sometimes I get so distracted I start mocking up concepts on paper, and then I know I’m too far gone to get my clothes put away that day.

I feel like my subconscious is gaming the system. Anything to get away from having to do real stuff in the real world that my more curious half seems to be “essentially a waste of time”
 

Gnurp

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At some point instead of fighting it you learn to really flow with it like water. Our distraction and daydreaming turns out to be a superpower of sorts. It's linked to that unflappable light in us that inspires a bit of envy in others I think.

PLus you gotta pick the right song...
 

peoplesuck

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Well lets see, I've got a few small parrots that I'm currently loving/studying... They've kept me fascinated for years now...

I'm a techy guy and dad and gamer, so most of my other hobbies revolve around that. And I teach kids to code, which is great because everyone once in a while I get to coach itty bitty (probably) INTPs with their crazed, worried parents, which is strangely cathartic to witness and to... deescalate...
parrots are awesome, have you played dark souls?
 

Inexorable Username

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At some point instead of fighting it you learn to really flow with it like water. Our distraction and daydreaming turns out to be a superpower of sorts. It's linked to that unflappable light in us that inspires a bit of envy in others I think.

PLus you gotta pick the right song...
What do you see in your head when you listen to music?
 

Gnurp

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Nothing really.. I tend to listen to music really loud (subs in my car, etc) - I realize now as part of controlling my environment to focus. When I work, when I drive, when I am home alone tryin ta do some chores... I listen to instrumental music or with lyrics I can't understand. Otherwise I find myself correcting lyrics instead of shakin my booty.

That's relatively new though. When I was younger I used to listen to songs with angry lyrics and imagined all sorts of scenarios - great and terrible.

Young grungy me might have imagined something like what's playing in this video (happens to be a video to a song I like from back in the day) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qdx9F00EjQA (I suppose I sort of liked songs with short old movie audio clips like "they lived, without hope" because it lets me imagine what he's talking about.

Old calmer me is more into this sorta thing: , and I'm more concerned with watching my birds react to certain sounds in the songs. (the rooster in this song sets all my squeakers squeakin.)

I'm still bad at relationships, so I still have angry days..... luckily the world keeps churning out good angry music. But really, I only daydream to music when I am upset - and as I get older, I get harder to upset.
 

Inexorable Username

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Nothing really.. I tend to listen to music really loud (subs in my car, etc) - I realize now as part of controlling my environment to focus. When I work, when I drive, when I am home alone tryin ta do some chores... I listen to instrumental music or with lyrics I can't understand. Otherwise I find myself correcting lyrics instead of shakin my booty.

That's relatively new though. When I was younger I used to listen to songs with angry lyrics and imagined all sorts of scenarios - great and terrible.

Young grungy me might have imagined something like what's playing in this video (happens to be a video to a song I like from back in the day) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qdx9F00EjQA (I suppose I sort of liked songs with short old movie audio clips like "they lived, without hope" because it lets me imagine what he's talking about.

Old calmer me is more into this sorta thing: , and I'm more concerned with watching my birds react to certain sounds in the songs. (the rooster in this song sets all my squeakers squeakin.)

I'm still bad at relationships, so I still have angry days..... luckily the world keeps churning out good angry music. But really, I only daydream to music when I am upset - and as I get older, I get harder to upset.
When you daydream do you see a static scene or multiple scenes, and where are you in relation to said scenes?
 

Gnurp

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I'd say typically multiple scenes and I'm usually an observer. But I don't feel I can answer accurately without actually logging my daydreams...
 

Inexorable Username

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I'd say typically multiple scenes and I'm usually an observer. But I don't feel I can answer accurately without actually logging my daydreams...
Interesting. So these daydreams of yours...they’re not something you consciously focus on.
I’m guessing these are daydreams you have when you’re doing the dishes - or...well you indicated you might be married. So I’m not sure what mundane rolls men do. Lol. Sorry. FIXING! Do you daydream when you’re fixing things like...faucets?

If so, perhaps you would be mulling over recent social interactions. Maybe you should log your daydreams. That could be interesting.
 

Gnurp

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Interesting. So these daydreams of yours...they’re not something you consciously focus on.
I’m guessing these are daydreams you have when you’re doing the dishes - or...well you indicated you might be married. So I’m not sure what mundane rolls men do. Lol. Sorry. FIXING! Do you daydream when you’re fixing things like...faucets?

If so, perhaps you would be mulling over recent social interactions. Maybe you should log your daydreams. That could be interesting.
Doing dishes has nothing to do with sex or gender... But yea, if I were to do some dishes I might start to daydream about christmas decorations ((semi-deliberately) and by the time the dishes are done I could easily have solved some issue with an unrelated program i'm writing, and have reached no conclusion about xmas decor.

And if you were to interrupt me and could see the image in my mind before it poofed, you might find me observing a friends tatoo removal I'd been pondering.

I guess what I'm saying it I don't really get to choose what I daydream about, but I've developed some faith that I need to daydream to solve some problems and I don't mind how scattered it seems.
 

Inexorable Username

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Interesting. So these daydreams of yours...they’re not something you consciously focus on.
I’m guessing these are daydreams you have when you’re doing the dishes - or...well you indicated you might be married. So I’m not sure what mundane rolls men do. Lol. Sorry. FIXING! Do you daydream when you’re fixing things like...faucets?

If so, perhaps you would be mulling over recent social interactions. Maybe you should log your daydreams. That could be interesting.
Doing dishes has nothing to do with sex or gender... But yea, if I were to do some dishes I might start to daydream about christmas decorations ((semi-deliberately) and by the time the dishes are done I could easily have solved some issue with an unrelated program i'm writing, and have reached no conclusion about xmas decor.

And if you were to interrupt me and could see the image in my mind before it poofed, you might find me observing a friends tatoo removal I'd been pondering.

I guess what I'm saying it I don't really get to choose what I daydream about, but I've developed some faith that I need to daydream to solve some problems and I don't mind how scattered it seems.
I’ve recently (the last few days) started coming to a similar conclusion - only not regarding daydreaming, but regarding fantasizing/visualising and it’s application in helping me to solve problems. It’s traditionally something I struggled to block out, but I’m starting to see it as a powerful tool.

I daydream similarly, and I’m addicted to it. I don’t actually think it’s constructive. Of course, I can solve problems with it, and I’ve tried to do the same thing you’re doing - making my daydreams have a purpose. However, in studying Buddhism and my shadow function, I’ve come to appreciate that being stuck in my head all day is holding me back. Causes procrastination, slowness in completing tasks, lack of focus, and makes me disorganized/lose things. I’ve been working to try to be a little more “connected” to the world around me when I’m completing tasks.
 

Gnurp

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I think it's at the heart of our talent for idea generation. And I think that being able to rely on oneself for ideas is one of our most liberating talents - but it only works properly when we're happy and healthy...

Society may see us as aloof and absent minded, and dub us lazy. But the truth is I wake up in the morning with my mind racing and it's always racing. I'm sure yours probably is too. Not lazy at all.
 

Inexorable Username

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I think it's at the heart of our talent for idea generation. And I think that being able to rely on oneself for ideas is one of our most liberating talents - but it only works properly when we're happy and healthy...

Society may see us as aloof and absent minded, and dub us lazy. But the truth is I wake up in the morning with my mind racing and it's always racing. I'm sure yours probably is too. Not lazy at all.
Sure, but just because we're good at something, doesn't mean that it's good to indulge in it excessively. I think that's what learning about the MBTI is about to some degree...learning about your shadow function. Being a daydreamer has a lot of negative consequences, and I think having the choice of when to daydream is potentially more valuable.
 

Gnurp

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Are the consequences for excessive daydreaming natural or artificially imposed on us?
 

EndogenousRebel

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I don't think there is any society that intentionally targets and punishes excessive daydreaming. Life requires a degree of conscientiousness, and seeing as most people are operating within it in the same manner(s), there are expectations that you will do the same. If you daydream so much that you are overly oblivious to the environment you're apt to be disadvantaged for many reasons, but you would be disadvantaged by virtue that other people are more lucid more often than you. I guess the answer to your question would depend on what your definition of artificial is, but to me this is a natural occurring phenomena from our environment, a product of competitiveness and due diligence.

Daydreaming is a naturally selected trait, and is a diffused mode of thinking, if you just add pen and paper and suddenly you're a sort of cartographer for your ideas. There are plenty of people that carry around scratch paper to jot down random ideas they have throughout the day. Daydreaming is good, doing so to the point of fantasy is not, I learned this the hard way.
 

Gnurp

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"I don't think there is any society that intentionally targets and punishes excessive daydreaming."
While not intentional, would you agree that society has been sluggish to address cultural norms that are stressors for atypical personalities?

"Life requires a degree of conscientiousness... "
Tell that to my lawn.

"...and seeing as most people are operating within it in the same manner(s), there are expectations that you will do the same. "
Are you claiming that most of the people around me are not excessive daydreamers by some internal discipline that I am too lazy to admit exists? I think you're giving them a bit more cognitive credit than they deserve...

"Daydreaming is a naturally selected trait, ..."
For or against, do you suppose? Do you imagine there was once a homo-diffused-mode-thinkians species that we bested with our superior mental discipline? If so I'm not sure I'm glad for it... I would have liked to meet them...
 

Inexorable Username

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@Gnurp

Responding specifically to your comments
I'll post personal beliefs in another message


I hope this isn't getting to be too much of a stressful topic for you! Of course, as an older INTP, I'm sure you can identify with the fact that this very subject is a very personal one for most of us here! I think we all battle with it!

One of the important things to realize is that we are, as you said, all very different people. I think, especially with this personality type, we come in many different flavors. It's rather arrogant, therefore, for a person such as myself to assume that the philosophies I've evolved that have been beneficial for me, are ideal for other INTPs as well. Arrogance is something I battle with. I don't believe I actually am arrogant, but I'm constantly worried that I might become so if I don't actively fight it!

Society has definitely never accepted me. However, I've come to appreciate later in my life that there are, potentially, some good reasons as to why that is. The system of society has to function in such a way as to ensure that the largest number of people become successful, and in too many ways, I represent the outlier. That being said, I think that because I'm an outlier, I can see a lot of ways in which the system needs improvement. Education - that's a big one.

Your comment about the lawn...that cracked me up! You don't know me very well. I have a veerrryyy weird "pet-peeve" of sorts. I cannot stand grass-obsessed Americans! Don't even get me started! If you want the damn grass, let it grow. Stop cutting it to within an inch of its life and then routinely complaining and blowing money on making the grass conform to your standard of being a weird prickly green outdoor carpet. Grass isn't even good for the environment. It's just a - well anyways...Let me not go down that road! Haha.

I think your interpretation of EndogenousRebel's statement regarding "laziness" might be more of a reflection of what you think people think about daydreamers, and less of a reflection of what they actually said. ER Made a point to mention that they don't think society intentionally punishes daydreamers, but that society expects people to act in accordance to the "norm". I think that's absolutely the case, and it makes logical sense that it would be so. INTPs are apparently 2% of the population, and even within that, there seems to be a lot of variance. Most of us appear to be very unusual. We can't reasonably expect, therefore, that a majority of the population would be able to relate to us. People expect others to act in a way that they can relate to. It's how we interpret the behavior and intentions of others.

Not sure about the "naturally selected" comment. That, I think, might need clarification.
 

EndogenousRebel

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Our capitalist economic system hinges on results and deadlines, because the desired result is productivity and profit, and profit is king. People in charge don't give a fuck about ones temperament, if you can't do what they want done then you easily replaceable by someone who is eager to take your wage. It is only in highly developed countries where what I would call subcultures (there probably is a better term for it) are being coddled/tended to, and usually it's just so fucking business can target them better and make more money. Of course I'm generalizing, and people can have human to human interactions that make things easier. If you communicate that you are a certain way, not by choice, then within that system you will be given more wiggle room, but this opens doors to abuse so you also might not. I will withhold disagreeing/agreeing with your question, as there is no personality police. I'm not privy to the psychological and sociological consensus on personalities, and I'm sure we'll have answers for those questions the more and more we can map the brains of the population at large.

If you find a human that can sit in the sun all day and convert it's rays into energy they can consume, let me know. This comment makes me think you have a narrow view of conscientiousness and or intelligence in general, not trying to be a punk that's just the impression I'm getting.

"Are you claiming that most of the people around me are not excessive daydreamers by some internal discipline that I am too lazy to admit exists? " idk where this is coming from. The average age of someone alive right now is around 30-40, they know that everyone else is separate from themselves, you don't need to be a genius to understand object permanence or the fact that everyone works for money. The expectation I'm talking about is survival itself. It's a 50/50 chance that you're talking to someone who is in some form competent, those odds aren't bad if you ask me.

"Do you imagine there was once a homo-diffused-mode-thinkians species that we bested with our superior mental discipline? " More like they were better at reproducing since they played and tested ideas more, as opposed to being emptyheaded flesh, probably followers if anything.
 

Inexorable Username

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@EndogenousRebel

So, maybe you should revisit that notion about fantasy. Let me share a perspective with you that I've developed over time. I did, in fact, come to a point where I thought fantasy was holding me back, but I did end up finally changing my mind about that.

Fantasy, from what my research suggests, is one of the most powerful human motivators. If we can fantasize a goal, it is much, much easier to obtain said goal without having to exercise rigorous, consistent discipline. Fantasy is also what drives us to learn. We experience fantasies in various fashions. We fantasize about being able to play a musical instrument, we fantasize about being "popular" (some of us anyways), we fantasize about having money. Our fantasies instill the sensation of desire within us that feeds our ambition, motivates us, and very importantly - determines to what degree we receive positive biological feedback for successes along the way. Ie: Dopamine, and the like.

So to nurture a fantasy, and feed it, is to create a template for a hormonally balanced, ambitious life.

Fantasizing also increases our ability to visualize, which is one of the most powerful tools for problem-solving, especially when it comes to spacial relations, I think. This capacity to visualize, and to creativity manipulate our visuals, also gives us the ability to understand extremely large, macro-scale concepts, that cannot easily be expressed in words or simple pictures. I'm sure Einstein, for instance, was a very skilled visualizer.

Here are some things that fantasy accomplishes (imo):

  • Demonstrates our morals and values, and continues to imprint the emotion that helps us to sustain them
  • Expresses our deeper dreams and emotionally imprints desire and an association for higher degrees of positive and negative biological feedback, which encourages ambition.
  • Improves our ability to visualize, and creatively manipulate our visuals.
  • Improves our ability to abstract, and to understand complex, large-scale problems in a way that extends beyond the human's physical, practical means of representation
  • Helps us to cope with stress, understand and relieve pain, and disassociate with situations that are more than what our body is equipped to handle.
  • Developing fantasies and visualizations most likely has a structural affect on the brain, (need to research), and can possibly lead to lucid dreaming, and a heightened ability to have out-of-body experiences.
The downsides of fantasy:

I think, in particular, fantasies which take the form of dreams (bits of images and memories shifting in and out of focus in a piece-meal fashion, scattered with phrases and the like...) are not helpful to us. At least, I have found that they are not helpful to me, and I've seen nothing in my research to suggest that they would be helpful.

These types of fantasies most often seem to fall into the realm of "escapism", and can seem to become somewhat addictive. They can dominate the brain, causing the limbic system to be overly-active, and provide us with a reactive, animalistic, emotionally-inspired state. These are the kinds of fantasies you would have when you have to do something you normally procrastinate, or when you're afflicted with boredom (such as sitting in church), and I think people who have them regard them as something of a drug. It's a way to drug yourself into getting through something that deprives the brain of stimulus. Brains can't stand to be deprived of stimulus (a brain without action is braindead). We have a degree of fear, I think, in fact, when it comes to letting go of these tendencies.

Letting go of them, though, I think is something that many INTPs may benefit from. Here is why I think that for me, personally:

"Waking dream" fantasies....
  • I lose things more
  • I forget what I was doing
  • I can take unnecessarily long "thinking pauses" when I should be working
  • I get out of focus
  • I do tasks much more slowly
  • I procrastinate tasks much more often
  • I fixate on past events I should not be concerning myself with
  • I fill my brain up with "clutter" that can sometimes keep me up at night
  • I fail to keep my "mental list" in the forefront of my brain, so I end up not accomplishing everything on the list
  • I become noticeably more "scatterbrained"
  • When this happens on a long-distance drive, I can miss my turn/highway exit
I learned how negatively these fantasies were affecting me once I started applying mindfulness meditation. It is a way of doing tasks, while meditating, and it focuses on quieting the brain and being in the present. It was very difficult for me.

Here was the payoff...
  • I procrastinated less
  • I rarely made mistakes
  • I got my work done twice as fast
  • I enjoyed my work much more than I actually enjoyed the fantasies
  • I found it easier and easier to focus
  • I rarely forgot anything, or lost anything
  • I was hyper-attuned to what was going on around me
  • I found creative ways to become more methodical and skilled with my actions
  • After mundane work, my brain was uncluttered and felt refreshed, ready for proactive thinking and progress
  • I became more creative
  • I became better at developing ideas and solving problems
  • I started to sleep better
  • I was much happier, and far less stressed
  • I had a significant improvement in confidence
  • Little things no longer upset me or made me irritable.
I did periods of sitting meditation as well, so that may also have influenced the pay off. At any rate, this stage of my personal learning made me begin to realize that being "trapped in my mind" all of the time was unhealthy for me. The healthy approach was to balance this tendency with actively practicing being a more "extroverted sensing" sort of a person - and learning to clear my mind, and live in the moment.

Research appears to back this up. There is a wealth of research discussing the positive biological impacts of meditation and how it can permanently change the structure of the brain to increase focus, and more.

My conclusion:

Indulging fantasies as a means of entertainment, and actively choosing which "stories" to live, is a positive thing. Allowing the brain to decide for itself when to serve up piece-meal fantasies as a replacement for having to engage in reality, is a negative thing.

Again, these are my opinions.

The reason I post them is that I had to go down this road, and it took me a long time to come to terms with the fact that the mental escapism I was using to stimulate myself when I was forced to do things that were boring to me, was not actually beneficial to my growth as a person, and was only holding me back, and making me more scatterbrained. If any of our other INTPs come across my post and identify with my assessment, hopefully they can take this advice as something of a shortcut, and try the things I eventually ended up trying a lot sooner than I did! :)
 

Inexorable Username

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Our capitalist economic system hinges on results and deadlines, because the desired result is productivity and profit, and profit is king. People in charge don't give a fuck about ones temperament, if you can't do what they want done then you easily replaceable by someone who is eager to take your wage. It is only in highly developed countries where what I would call subcultures (there probably is a better term for it) are being coddled/tended to, and usually it's just so fucking business can target them better and make more money. Of course I'm generalizing, and people can have human to human interactions that make things easier. If you communicate that you are a certain way, not by choice, then within that system you will be given more wiggle room, but this opens doors to abuse so you also might not. I will withhold disagreeing/agreeing with your question, as there is no personality police. I'm not privy to the psychological and sociological consensus on personalities, and I'm sure we'll have answers for those questions the more and more we can map the brains of the population at large.

If you find a human that can sit in the sun all day and convert it's rays into energy they can consume, let me know. This comment makes me think you have a narrow view of conscientiousness and or intelligence in general, not trying to be a punk that's just the impression I'm getting.

"Are you claiming that most of the people around me are not excessive daydreamers by some internal discipline that I am too lazy to admit exists? " idk where this is coming from. The average age of someone alive right now is around 30-40, they know that everyone else is separate from themselves, you don't need to be a genius to understand object permanence or the fact that everyone works for money. The expectation I'm talking about is survival itself. It's a 50/50 chance that you're talking to someone who is in some form competent, those odds aren't bad if you ask me.

"Do you imagine there was once a homo-diffused-mode-thinkians species that we bested with our superior mental discipline? " More like they were better at reproducing since they played and tested ideas more, as opposed to being emptyheaded flesh, probably followers if anything.
Hmmm...it is my experience, that social opinion is pretty defunct. Most of the "wise advice" I was told growing up was pretty inaccurate, actually.
Insofar as everyone being after money?
This, I would contradict. However, it'll take quite a long time to contradict it. So I'll just say that, in order to have the "money drive", you sort of either need to have experienced a good deal of wanting what you can't have for lack of money, or you need to be inspired by the rat race - earning the admiration of your fellow man due to your wealth and status. I can think of many, many examples where people are not money driven. As for me, I've only recently become somewhat concerned with money.

Anyways, there are other countries where these "subcultures" of dreamers are not coddled to...and they happen to not be very creative countries. We have a lot of art, music, advertising, cinema, and similar that comes out of the USA because we are coddled, idealistic, and allowed to live contented lives of identity independence and expressionism. Sure, there's downsides. There are upsides too.

I think you're becoming tipped a little too far over on the pessimism side of things. There are plenty of things wrong with capitalism and this country, but our acceptance of creativity and uncommonly-minded individuals is actually, probably, something to be somewhat admired.

Compare our country to China. The Chinese I've met are not very happy people. The culture is extremely money-driven, and I think you would be really, really, really hard-pressed to find a Chinese person who is not. They also tend to be harsh, critical, judgmental, and incredibly pragmatic. If you prefer the American culture to the Chinese culture, then perhaps there are aspects of this more creative style that you do, in fact, find valuable.

At any rate, our social system is designed to produce conformity among the majority of the populous. Without that, we would disintegrate. It should come as no surprise, therefore, that outliers are regarded with a dubious attitude. However, without the outliers, our country would not have achieved what it has achieved. So - do the people support the outliers? No, I don't think so. Does the government? Yes...In fact, they seek out and hire them, often times. When you get right down to it, who are you risking when you choose an unconventional path in life? Yourself. If you're willing to potentially sacrifice yourself for the chance at being unconventionally successful - well, all the more power to you.
 

Gnurp

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Nov 20, 2019
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42
Location
Georgia, USA
Pff don't read me as offended you weirdos. I'm enjoying the shit outta y'all and every topic we hit. Especially when you criticise me.... oh gawd....


I spent an eternity on forums with normies before you came along...
 

EndogenousRebel

We're all trying our best. Aren't we?
Local time
Today, 15:42
Joined
Jun 13, 2019
Messages
206
Location
Narnia
@Inexorable Username
Don't get me wrong I still have the healthy ideal that anything is possible, in a way I have to, else I would be a bigger mess than I already am. But one must be pragmatic and prudent. There is a lot of utility in vision, being a visionary, practicing it and building upon it, but people are conventionally focused on outcomes rather than progress. The law of attraction only works in certain conditions for example, simply imagining that you're going to pass a test changes nothing, but imagining studying for the test will make easier to study, as it's basically planning.

You should check out Joseph Rodriguez on YouTube, he makes videos about these sort of things, subconscious mind and what not. He appears to genuinely practice what he preaches and is very spiritual, so he sometimes goes there, but it's useful nonetheless.
 

EndogenousRebel

We're all trying our best. Aren't we?
Local time
Today, 15:42
Joined
Jun 13, 2019
Messages
206
Location
Narnia
I think you're becoming tipped a little too far over on the pessimism side of things. There are plenty of things wrong with capitalism and this country, but our acceptance of creativity and uncommonly-minded individuals is actually, probably, something to be somewhat admired.
You're probably right. Maslows hierarchy of needs would imply that people that are secure in their finances would be more focused on human connection. But money is still paramount to most people.


Pff don't read me as offended you weirdos. I'm enjoying the shit outta y'all and every topic we hit. Especially when you criticise me.... oh gawd....


I spent an eternity on forums with normies before you came along...
You know only the first month is free right?
 

Inexorable Username

Well-Known Member
Local time
Today, 16:42
Joined
Nov 14, 2019
Messages
548
I spent an eternity on forums with normies before you came along
What is a normie...? I wouldn't know. I'm not much of an "online community" kind of girl. Or a real life community kind of girl...lol. Also that cat. Good lord. Looking at it makes me feel like I'm going to have a seizure. Here. This is way cuter. Don't say I never did you any favors.



You should check out Joseph Rodriguez on YouTube, he makes videos about these sort of things
Oh I will! I absolutely love suggestions like this! Always eager to find new YouTube channels! I actually made a thread for it. Please feel free to give more recommendations! I have a lot to work on. I could benefit from taking a firmer stance on practicality and conventional lifestyle. If you like history at all, you should check out LindyBeige. The White Headhunter and the video on Napolean's greatest foe are two of his best, in my opinion. I wasn't too terribly interested in history until I stumbled across Lloyd's channel. There's some military psychology in there as well, which is quite fascinating! Also, while it's on a more superficial level, you might like Charisma On Command. I've found it to be instructional in regards to working with culture.

It's been great chatting with you guys, but pseudo-ironically, I probably should get back to work!
 

Inexorable Username

Well-Known Member
Local time
Today, 16:42
Joined
Nov 14, 2019
Messages
548
Definitely let me know if you guys have any other YouTube suggestions for me. It's where I pick up most of my generic knowledge.
 
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