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Your college experience

Alex_

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I see some old threads about college and what everyone thinks about it, but I'm interested in thy experience in it.

How was it at first? And at last? Did you make any good friends, or just met a bunch of assholes? Did you failed many tests, did you party, did you stay at home, did you enjoy it, did you hate it? :rip:
 

nil

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I'm going into junior year at college, so I will provide my limited perspective on the matter.

I liked college at first, much better than the constricting atmosphere of and worthless drivel in high school. I quite enjoyed having the freedom to build my own schedule from the ground up and being away from my home, my hometown, and the people therein for considerable lengths of time. After a few weeks and a bit of thinking I realized that my first two years were going to be primarily all these general education classes which really doesn't make it so different from high school. I really cared nothing for most of these classes but maintained decent grades for the first year. In second year the drudgery combined with my being a poor student generally and a few other problems started taking their toll and I ended up not doing too well at all. Ah, but such is life.

As for friends, apart from my dorm roommate in first year and my apartment roommate currently I have made just about 0 friends in my two years there. I probably should make an effort to change that, but I just can't give a damn to care enough to interact with others.

So far, college has been pretty decent but I went into it with far too high of expectations. It has been a wide range of different emotions, but still better than anything that happened in my high school years.
 

Happy

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I'm in my fourth year (of 6)

Started off easy and there was a lot of partying in first year. As an INTP I got over the social aspect of it pretty fast. I mostly keep to myself at this point and rarely attend class (because they're all recorded and available online)

I'm pretty much seen as being friends with everyone. I'd say I'm one of the more popular people on campus (or at least was). The reality though, is that I only have a couple of actual friends now, and just get along with everyone else. My popularity is diminishing (as a result of my own efforts to do so).

I've never lived on campus, but I've always lived close. Also noteworthy is that I moved 500km to attend university.

As a whole, I enjoy it. There's aspects I dislike, but its a worthwhile experience. I'd recommend for an introvert to live off campus, but with a couple of students.
 

Hayyel

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I'm just finishing my masters, and I can say that it was a pretty boring affair.

My first years were generally annoying, because the classes I took seemed so simple, but then when it came to exams I failed a couple of them anyway. Since it was the first time I failed an exam, it was a bit terrifying, actually. Of course, slowly I came to knew what makes the professors tick so I tried to use that to my advantage.

I never lived on a campus - my uni is at about a 30 min bus ride from our home (yes, I still live with my parents), so I just used my free bus pass to go to classes.

Because of this, and because 99% of the people in my classes came from far away parts of the country, I never really made friends with them (I even despised a few of them, actually). Well, besides one girl, with whom I became good friends at the end of my bachelor, and with whom I'm currently attending the same classes.

Funnily enough, she turned out to be not that different from me (she also lives with her family in a tiny place, she also doesn't like too many people in our classes, and surprise, surprise, she is also INTP.

So no, I didn't party - actually I kept away from any parties, because I didn't like the people.
 

Architect

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I enjoyed it. Worked hard and didn't party. I got my partying over with at the end of High School. I consciously did some partying at that point knowing that I wanted to do it and forget it (partying is a forgettable activity).

I'm glad it's over. The surprise was that it wasn't the deep learning activity I thought it would be. I did physics, and it's basically a race to see how fast you can cover broad topics. Grad school is the opposite where you quickly dive deep into some specific thing. But there at least if you have the discipline you can continue to take a lot of classes.

Glad it's done, glad I did it, I wonder sometimes what the real lessons of college were.
 

TimeAsylums

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I thought the teaching (deepness) would be deeper/better than highschool...nope. College (undergraduate, bachelors, anyway) is merely AP highschool (to clarify: not hard). Maybe 80% route memorization and 20% use your brain...or less. Then again it could depend on your major, but for undergrad, ...prettymuch. Partying gets old fast, I don't see the point >_<, but I still go to socialize...cuz welll E(NTP), lol INTPs might be open about their disdain, we'll suck it up a lot more.

Note, it may have seemed deeper to a lot of the 'S,' but that's for them...
The best part is probably: meeting people.
but quite the expensive bill people are footing these days to 'meet people' X_X
ugh, undergrad.
@Architect, at least Grad school sounds a little better.
 

Valentas

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I enjoyed it. Worked hard and didn't party. I got my partying over with at the end of High School. I consciously did some partying at that point knowing that I wanted to do it and forget it (partying is a forgettable activity).

I'm glad it's over. The surprise was that it wasn't the deep learning activity I thought it would be. I did physics, and it's basically a race to see how fast you can cover broad topics. Grad school is the opposite where you quickly dive deep into some specific thing. But there at least if you have the discipline you can continue to take a lot of classes.

Glad it's done, glad I did it, I wonder sometimes what the real lessons of college were.

Follow Archie's path fellow INTPs. You will be successful and wealthy geek as he is. :) I don't enjoy partying also. I prefer walking in the park or reading books instead. I can still recall my usual scenario at class party. I walk around, everyone dances then someone invites me to join, I move awkwardly and pretend I am happy. When I get bored(2 mins usually), I get out outside from loud music and all this raving.Eh.
 

TimeAsylums

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heheh, I try to seek out all the NTs and attach them to my entourage ;)
of course I can't consciously tell the INTPs I'm doing this -__-
...but I do.
 

Etheri

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I just finished my third year of uni in belgium. I'll have my results sometime next week.

So far I quite like it. The freedom is amazing. Generally speaking there's not alot of things I 'have' to do. It's getting worse as the years progress, but the first few years all you have to do is pass your exams. You don't have to do homework. You don't have to go to any classes. You don't have to do anything. It's all optional. I party and go out at times, but not too much. I fail some tests, but that's mostly because I've always caught up after retakes (august). I also try to have between 2 and 4 retakes because they're the best social excuse ever.

I've met plenty of nice people, but mostly extraverts and sensors. I still sincerely need my time alone, which is usually how I spend quite a big part of my day. There's assholes and smart retards all over the place, but in general everyone here occupies themselves with their own stuff. If you don't like certain people, then you don't hang out and sit with them. Easy.

Also, big lectures (200+ people) can be amazing. You can blend in and see others in their natural environment. There's often people everywhere, but it's not too hard to make sure they don't bother you. You're in class after all.
 

Foxman49

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I just finished my first year, so I can't tell you all that much. I go to a small liberal arts school and I really enjoy it. The freedom is amazing. It is a life giving balm to an INTP because there aren't many schedules you need to stick to. (just show up to class and meetings on time). I like everyone else have met many extraverts and sensors (damn party dorm). They seem to like me, but I try to avoid them. I made a lot of intuitive friends though, so its great. The place I'll be living this coming semester is loaded with NTs. It is going to be fun.

As far as classes go, I had a bunch of AP credits, so I didn't need to take a lot of intro classes. I enjoy the majority of my classes (except for intro psych. I hated those tests!). I took two philosophy classes on the side (an introductory class and one on metaphysics) which I enjoyed. I might even minor in it.

Speaking of graduate school, I took a class that my professor described as "a graduate level class that is being taught to second year students." (and I'm a freshman) It was an in-depth class on history theory and some philosophy of history. I really enjoyed the class, but it was a lot of work (and a lot of writing).

Reading everyone else's posts, it seems my experience is quite atypical.
 

TimeAsylums

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Reading everyone else's posts, it seems my experience is quite atypical.
The only aytypical thing about it is that you'll be living with a bunch of NTs O_o like how the hell.
 

Absurdity

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I can't wait to graduate. Most of the people I've met have been sensors or ENFs, so I spend a lot of time alone doing work (and there is a lot of it) or reading.

I got a lot of partying out of my system early on so I'm absolutely bored to tears by nights out at some shitty bar or some decadent frat house. Plus I used to use alcohol as a social crutch which got dangerous once I spent time around the wrong people.

The best experience I had was taking a semester off to intern. Went to a city I'd never been to before for 3-4 months and worked in a field I ended up loving. Strongly recommend people currently in college or soon to be attending to take this chance when you have so few commitments to go explore as much as possible.

I didn't learn much from my classes since I'm in a bullshit major but I did take the opportunity to figure out what kind of person I am and what sort of future I want to have. Look up alumni that are doing something interesting and get in contact with them to talk about it. I'd also recommend doing a Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory, which is usually offered for free through most college career centers.

Also, as far as applying to schools, aim high. The names of elite schools (Ivies, Stanford, MIT, Duke, etc.) carry a ton of weight and can seriously open doors. If you can tough out a few years around a bunch of shallow, greedy morons (most of whom are there via nepotism), you'll find it's worth the agony.

PS: I apologize for my shitty grammar. Just one of those days.
 

Absurdity

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Guess I never asked, but what is your major @Absurdity?
Assuming it's not any of the STEM then, just curious?
The program is unique to my school, which I would rather not name.

Essentially interdisciplinary social sciences and humanities. I was originally planning on going to law school.
 

Foxman49

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The only aytypical thing about it is that you'll be living with a bunch of NTs O_o like how the hell.
There is this house just off campus that selects people to create an intellectual atmosphere (we even have discussions every Sunday). You needed to apply and all, but it wasn't all that much extra work really. (and with my limited decent housing options I thought it would be completely worth it) It pulls in the NTs. I don't know everyone there yet, but most of them seem to be NTs (With one or two well rounded Fs).
 

TimeAsylums

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interdisciplinary social sciences and humanities. I was originally planning on going to law school.
hmm, originally? So I'm guessing not anymore then, what are your plans/hopes after graduating now then?
 

TimeAsylums

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??:confused:

Are you saying I'm going to die or something? Or did that sentence not make sense?
I'm saying I don't believe it. I mean of course there are certain buildings/places that wish to create an intellectual atmosphere, but even a lot of those programs will be filled with a lot of other types (I mean despite our superficial bias against sensors read: just jokingly, we know they're smart and we're smart just in different areas and aspects a lot of the time, rather, we think in different ways - which can clash edges), do you know how hard I have to strive to find other NTs, don't get me wrong I love other types, I love all people, I've had bestfriend SPs and SJs, but that ability to discuss and converse about other things they're not interested in, I only find with NTs.

it's outrageous that you could have a building full of NTs


had to make my posts actually somewhat sensical, thorough and longer; @THD :P
 

Magus

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Really dislike university. Got the chance to move interstate, which was nice initially, freedom all that jazz but I've managed to sorely mess up my transcript. Considering dropping out of law school properly in a few weeks. Might re-enroll for distance education, perhaps not.

Everyone's thinking it and I'm just saying it. I honestly don't see the the point of undergraduate education as it stands. It might have made sense in bygone ages when knowledge and information were so scarce that if you wanted to 'grow your mind' you had to spend time at uni but that era has long gone. Now they just hold a monopoly of issuing paper, whose only source of value is due to employers' use of them as a free (for them) means of grading prospective employees on intelligence/ability. I go to fairly top ranked uni and I've been pretty underwhelmed by the quality of academics here. I'm sure there are bright sparks, but they're probably concentrated in the physical sciences and mathematics. If I want to learn from someone, I'll go out and buy their books/watch their public lectures not listen to some 2bit professor give a series of crappy PowerPoint presentations which I'm expected to pay through the nose for.

Ironically I've learnt so much over the last 18 months however it has all been by myself and had nothing to do with the classes I've signed up for at the time.

They remain valuable as research institutions, I don't see how knowledge might be advanced unless the various experts in a given field are able to debate matters/share ideas but even then information technology makes the idea of a campus largely redundant.

It's too bad I wasn't born 10 years after when I was, I'd be able to just complete MOOCs as a recognized alternative to formal study. A lot of the students I know are either similarly underwhelmed by the experience or are E/S types who love the campus lifestyle. At least on the undergraduate level I think the racket as been allowed to fester for as long as it is largely due to the cultural obsession attached to formal education and a desire to postpone responsibility/adult life among young people.
 

Nezaros

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I just finished my first year at a tiny community college in Buttfuck Nowhere, Redneckistan. Going back in the fall. First semester mostly sucked, because I don't make friends. But halfway through I found a group of nerds to play D&D with, among other things, so the second semester was much, much better. However, most of my friends, including my best friend, left after this semester, and aside from the tiny island of intelligent people I've befriended, and the flight school, there is no reason whatsoever for me to stay, so I'll be transferring to a university in January. It may lead to the first time I've had to study since... ever, but I think it'll be well worth it. Anything to not have to live in a town where there are more horses than people, and the conservatism is palpable.
 

TimeAsylums

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Everyone's thinking it and I'm just saying it. I honestly don't see the the point of undergraduate education as it stands.
Oh, you'll be challenged to find anyone who disagrees here.
It's been said many a times it's one of the best schemes of all times.
I even tried being a devil's advocate for the other side of this argument and I can't stand it
unfortunately:
You can't get a lot of white collar (a few blue collar) jobs without a degree. I will not disagree with you that the univ/education system sucks, few people would or should. We've long since developed critical thinking. And the only points on here people can make is that it teaches you how to cope/be one/be social with society, and that's a what the fuck argument, so you're saying people are going into debt for that, no. Some people simply see it as a means of "paying your dues," also a wtf argument. I'm not saying people shouldn't pursue education - that statement would be shot down in an instant, it's the system that is massively flawed - but there's not really much going on to change it - MOOCs are indeed growing up fast - but not fast enough.

The fact of the matter (not saying I agree with it) is that you probably, really, need that the degree - it's pretty much your ticket to the future.
It's pretty much summed up as : The system sucks, suck it up.
Not anywhere in the state that it should be, but the only real opponent i've seen is indeed MOOCs, but like I said it will be quite some time before that can 'revolutionize' the system, if at all.

...I almost had a mental breakdown thinking about the hypocrisy of it all while sitting in class :kodama1:
I believe @Absurdity can attest to my madness at first...
 

just george

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I guess the most succinct way to put it is that most people think of high school being this vicious, horrible thing full of jocks and mean girls, where the nerds were picked on etc until they left, got jobs, and the nerds became cool/rich, and the jocks became garbage men.

Uni was a bit like that. I didn't particularly get along with many people, and lecturers hated my guts because I didn't do things their way. ie I liked to stay home and read the literature, rather than go to a class and have someone read it out to me so that they could justify having a job.

They tried kicking me out of uni twice with various preclusions/rules etc, but I stayed and brawled until I finally got through.

Then I entered the real world, and slapped everyone.

So yah. Didn't like it, but it helped my resiliency just a little bit :)
 

Architect

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I guess the most succinct way to put it is that most people think of high school being this vicious, horrible thing full of jocks and mean girls, where the nerds were picked on etc until they left, got jobs, and the nerds became cool/rich, and the jocks became garbage men.
Pretty much. I don't think the in crowd went much of anywhere, whereas I was one of the nerds who the rednecks liked to pick fights with because I was tall. Now I pwn them.

I heard the story that one of the female teachers pointed me out to the cheerleaders and told them that I was the guy they wanted to catch (I think I was just beginning to grow into my own). Of course none of them did, but it made them pause. At any rate obviously they lost out big time. I hear one of the cheerleaders kept asking after me at the HS reunions I never went to.
 

Arzailich

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As a schizoid/avoidant with depressive traits, college hasn't been easy so far. I explored various options to study, and most of them seemed like bullshit. Sometimes I think I could have preferred to sink in a f****** hole and die in the simplest way. But I decided to go on with a career that evoked me some sympathy. I usually experiment this kind of situations:
-Lack of concentration when studying leaves me with not much preparation for exams. I usually spend about two hours instead of ten. Anyways, my grades aren't a disaster.
-Having very limited social interaction can feel comfortable for me most of time, but when facing hard subjects and help seems to be a good option is not the best thing. I never attend to social things like parties and If I hold a conversation with someone of the five people I know and trust enough, is about once a month.

Anyways, I'm glad I made it so far. I expect to do something useful when I finish it in two years more.
 

kvothe27

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I enjoy college because it gives me an excuse to not work full time. I get to spend my days reading and learning new things. Even though I dislike many of my professors, I can usually get by by just reading the textbook and not paying much attention in lectures.

I really didn't make any friends in college. I'm a lone wolf and really don't like people enough to be friends with anyone. I haven't failed any classes and it's pretty normal for me to get class high scores. I have failed a few tests, but I would outscore most people anyway, so the eventual class curve would take care of it.

No, I don't enjoy partying. I rarely enjoy socializing. The extent of my "partying" consisted of me getting stoned by myself. I stayed at home for my first degree, but I've been living on my own for my second degree.

Yes, I enjoy it more than the alternatives open to me at the moment. My anxiety problems combined with me being on the autism spectrum makes most jobs intolerable for me.
 

Valentas

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I think all you who cannot bother to make contacts at uni are making a mistake. It's a lot easier to land first job if you get on with professors you like very well as well as helping your fellow class mates as much as you can.

I remember helping one guy I know landing a job because I knew a person who could employ him. Do you know how everything worked out? He pointed me to the right person when I needed help. So make an effort to help others to make your life easier. But only if you want to help them.
 

Pyropyro

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I think all you who cannot bother to make contacts at uni are making a mistake. It's a lot easier to land first job if you get on with professors you like very well as well as helping your fellow class mates as much as you can.

I remember helping one guy I know landing a job because I knew a person who could employ him. Do you know how everything worked out? He pointed me to the right person when I needed help. So make an effort to help others to make your life easier. But only if you want to help them.
I agree on this one. I landed the job that I just left due to my thesis adviser's recommendation.

Networking is very important especially for us INTPs who are too independent for comfort.
 

walfin

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I was quite happy but it was a strain on my finances.
 

Smooch

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Seems like many of you had positive experiences.

I'm a sophomore in college and it's been an absolute struggle from day one. My academic career started going downhill in 8th grade though, so no surprise there.
I don't have to worry about the financial aspect so much as I go to a community college, get grants, and have a college fund that was set up for me by dad.

I do find that most teachers have to cover a lot of information in a short amount of time...especially in summer classes. Dear God, the summer classes. O__O
Then again even when I was only working part time I was struggling.

I haven't actually made any lasting friends at my college. I'll talk to whoever's in my class but won't hang out with them outside of school.

In general-my experience in college is slowly getting better as I learn what's expected of me and how much work I can handle at once.

My biggest advice is to know your limits. Don't over commit yourself. Would you rather take your time and graduate with all A's or speed through it and graduate with Bs and Cs?
 
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Well, I took a different route in life, decided to travel the world for a couple of years before going off to school. Wised up and came back where I earned a couple of majors, a bachelors and a Masters (all STEM). Now off to a PhD fellowship with a few papers under my belt. Some of you are right of course, college can be a scam if your cards aren't played right. Another good bet would be to go to a great school if you can like absurdity said. Overall you guys have great advice.
 

Pinion

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My peers are more mature than they were in high school, but I don't really have a social life. My bad. I don't go to parties, drink very much, or have an eye on the hotties, and I only sometimes talk to people and make friends. I guess I was bored of it by the end of high school.

I'm learning with more speed and eagerness than in my earlier schooling years, but it's not quite what I'd like. Don't compare things to things they're not that much like, just tell me what it is, how it works, and why. "Thing A is like a Sound C." No. No, it's a Thing A and it works like a Thing A, which I will now detail with illustrations and allow you to put your greasy hands all over...

I like my instructors, especially the older women. I relate to them more than my peers.

I'm having a good time.
 

TimeAsylums

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My First Year of College:

I met a lot of interesting, cool people.

INTP best friend has dropped out because he got offer to be a professional triathlete (as a side note, he is also crazy smart - obviously too smart for his own good, as he didn't pass two of his classes ... will extrapolate in a sec)

ESTx best friend drops out halfway through first semster and joins army

ENTP self has a mental break (slightly unrelated to college) and returns home (after finishing out the year, however also fails to pass a few classes with the INTP - ...both toosmart for own good, too lazy)

ISFP girlfriend, only one to remain consistent with college, despite emotional wreck, ahaha.


These four (myself included) people were my "group."

good times
 

Cavallier

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Generally speaking I had a good experience in uni. I think that it offers opportunities that you can choose to take or you can ignore. For me it provided a an escape from a small town filled with bigots, assholes, and everybody else who settled for rustling cows or working at the bar/grocery/gas station.

I think that you get out of it what you put into it. The first few years are simple basic intro classes that you can easily sail through or at least trudge through with a little application of will power. The more advanced classes were more interesting but my profs for those classes were also very self important or kind of insane. I had one prof who would make everyone read their essays out loud while he either berated them or praised them. It was horrible. Luckily I escaped with few scars and mostly was praised but I felt every acerbic word handed out to those less fortunate. I somehow survived three of his classes and admit to learning quite a bit from him but he was a monster.

Ultimately though, in my experience, I think you get out of it what you put into it. Find profs you respect and dig into whatever major you choose and it can be a positive experience. Fight the profs and don't connect to the study materials and you'll hate it.
 

just george

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Ultimately though, in my experience, I think you get out of it what you put into it. Find profs you respect and dig into whatever major you choose and it can be a positive experience. Fight the profs and don't connect to the study materials and you'll hate it.
Yep. The unfortunate thing is that most people assume that professors etc are ambivalent, fair handed people who love teaching. In my experience, many of them are petty egomaniacs who will treat you depending on how you make them feel, rather than how well you learn, and so it will help you greatly to get your professors on side.

My faculty was so bad, and the student population so isolated from them, that in 2nd year, two students committed suicide. Long story short, the average IQ of the student body was 130, yet 95% of students failed a particular class. International students who have never failed a test don't cope well with that sort of thing.

Anyway, the response of the faculty was to dodge all blame (despite the fact that 95% of a group of very smart people failing a basic class is not normal, or the fault of the students) and to appoint a "suicide officer" for you to talk to before you put a gun in your mouth. No one lost their job, or amended the coursework.

So yah. Professors aren't saints, and have an inordinate amount of power over students. Come up with a plan to deal with that.
 
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Yep. The unfortunate thing is that most people assume that professors etc are ambivalent, fair handed people who love teaching. In my experience, many of them are petty egomaniacs who will treat you depending on how you make them feel, rather than how well you learn, and so it will help you greatly to get your professors on side.

My faculty was so bad, and the student population so isolated from them, that in 2nd year, two students committed suicide. Long story short, the average IQ of the student body was 130, yet 95% of students failed a particular class. International students who have never failed a test don't cope well with that sort of thing.

Anyway, the response of the faculty was to dodge all blame (despite the fact that 95% of a group of very smart people failing a basic class is not normal, or the fault of the students) and to appoint a "suicide officer" for you to talk to before you put a gun in your mouth. No one lost their job, or amended the coursework.

So yah. Professors aren't saints, and have an inordinate amount of power over students. Come up with a plan to deal with that.
There is as much power in the myth of the almighty degree from 'higher' education these days as there was in the priesthood of the Church in past centuries. Wait a minute! *lightbulb* The more things change...the more they stay exactly the same. Its the exact same self installed false priesthood. Perhaps the only difference is (even their uniforms are the same don't believe me research where those gowns they all wear at grad ceremonies come from) that instead of sucking off the teat of the organized churches these days they suck off the teat of big government. The money is just as unrepresented by those being coerced into paying today as it always has been. Ticks are crafty little buggers.
 

just george

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There is as much power in the myth of the almighty degree from 'higher' education these days as there was in the priesthood of the Church in past centuries. Wait a minute! *lightbulb* The more things change...the more they stay exactly the same. Its the exact same self installed false priesthood. Perhaps the only difference is (even their uniforms are the same don't believe me research where those gowns they all wear at grad ceremonies come from) that instead of sucking off the teat of the organized churches these days they suck off the teat of big government. The money is just as unrepresented by those being coerced into paying today as it always has been. Ticks are crafty little buggers.
Yep. Just like the priests selected acolytes to become priests themselves after they prove their devotion to the faith through service, so too do professors choose academic acolytes.

If they like you, and you are one of the chosen ones, you are favored, and welcomed into the inner circle.

If you have your own ideas and don't show the required amount of respect, you are marginalized, and in extreme cases, labeled as were heretics, as a "crank".

You're right about the money, also. In churches, the money comes from church assets, and the voluntary contributions of the faithful. In schools, money comes from school assets (Harvard etc have billions in income bearing assets) and the not so voluntary collection of taxes from the public.

The ranks are similar also.
Initiates > novice > acolyte > priest > high priest
Undergrad > honors > masters > doctorate > ass. professor > professor

It's the same dynamic.
 

kvothe27

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Such is the problem with hierarchies. They can often become more about preserving and enforcing the hierarchy than about what the hierarchy was formed to accomplish in the first place. So, instead of higher education being entirely about learning, it often becomes focused on the hierarchy. Who's superior to whom. It's all really silly, but it's to the point. You get to learn how to navigate a hierarchy all while (hopefully) attempting to learn something. Obviously, hierarchies are something most of us need to learn to navigate in order to get anywhere in life.

My psychiatrist pointed out that getting a degree doesn't just demonstrate superior learning or understanding, if at all, but whether someone can cope while jumping through all those hoops. Many people, it turns out, cannot cope.
 

Cavallier

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I see where JG and House are coming from. I'd go so far as to say I agree. I had several acquaintances who fought their way through what they felt was a bullshit hierarchy and in the end left feeling like they wasted time and energy on university that was much better spent elsewhere.

I think I was more willing to play along, play the game, and get out of the profs what I wanted or needed. Then I discarded them and moved on. I had a few bright spots with a couple of absent minded men who were kind, knowledgeable, and tickled pink to find a bright young woman willing to learn from them. But most of the teachers were self-aggrandizing asses. I spouted the bullshit they wanted to hear while forming my own ideas and then went on my way. Oddly enough I learned these skills from my ENTP father. :D

I think that in preparing for the real world in this respect university is like boot camp. Get through, figure out how exploit the system, make a few useful friends, so on and so forth. I enjoyed most of it but I found a program I liked and I got along with most of the faculty (Without really any of the groveling that JG and House are implying). You can work your way through without losing your self respect. It is possible.
 

Cavallier

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My psychiatrist pointed out that getting a degree doesn't just demonstrate superior learning or understanding, if at all, but whether someone can cope while jumping through all those hoops. Many people, it turns out, cannot cope.
I completely agree with this.
 

just george

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(Without really any of the groveling that JG and House are implying). You can work your way through without losing your self respect. It is possible.
Grovel? Me? lol :D I fought hard and almost committed murder. They hated my rotten guts. They tried to preclude me (twice), invited me to meetings to convince me to quit (mere weeks before my final exam), instituted attendance regulations for the first time in their 60 year history because I refused to go to class (I was external student of the year twice - pharmacy isn't offered externally), failed me when by rights I had passed, and several years after I graduated, had classes about "proper behavior due to the actions of former students".

It was a hellish thing. And one of these days, when I see their 70 year old ass around the city somewhere, I am going to beat whatever teeth they have left out of their faces.

I even have the soundtrack for the massive beatdown picked out :twisteddevil: It is going to be fucken excellent

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2Eah_EGiDc
 
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College was quite a few years ago, but I thought responding to the OP would present an interesting memory lane to go down for a few moments.

I see some old threads about college and what everyone thinks about it, but I'm interested in thy experience in it.

How was it at first? And at last?
disorienting in terms of learning environment as well as living environment. Living away from home with no mom to do laundry and keep me fed was quite an adjustment. I hated k-12 public schooling through so I didn't think college would be any different. It was quite a surprise when about a semester and a half into it I found I actually liked it and I had an aptitude for academics and could do quite well (if and only if I applied myself).

Academic-wise I also benefited tremendously from taking a course my first semester on study skills/ life planning/ time management. I use a lot of that shit to this day. Extremely useful. A course in study skills and time management should probably be a prerequisite for INTPs. If only because that is the way this smelly world operates (damnable Es and Ss) and INTPs have to carve out a way to eat too.

I was also fortunate that I went to a small-er private university. I think that was immensely beneficial for my personality. I've always been about rejecting the one size fits all approach. I found out that when I could set my own schedule and goals (eg having choices about which courses to take/ not take) I enjoyed the process and did well.

Did you make any good friends, or just met a bunch of assholes?
Made a few good friends, 2 best friends I'm still in touch with regularly and a lot of assholes. I moved to another off campus apartment after the first semester because I was with a bunch of retards. My new roommates were awesome. And I ended up being good friends with that group over the years.

I don't think I realized it at the time, but most of my roommates that I got along with over the years knew that I was an introvert and gave me the space I needed[/QUOTE]

Did you failed many tests, did you party, did you stay at home, did you enjoy it, did you hate it? :rip:
Failed the first half semester. I am very all or nothing (probably a classic INTP trait?) and didn't know what I was doing the first half of that first semester. Hence the study skills course which gave me the knowledge to know how to get it done right.

Didn't really party persay. Overrated. Plus I am introverted bigtime. I went to some parties but it felt like high school popularity contest night all over again. Lame. I had a lot of fun with a small circle of friends on evenings and weekends for sure though.

I wish I had just stayed in by myself and took it easy once a week, though. To recharge. I know now that I need this.

Overall, I loved small university life. Most INTPs will likely love it generally, if the daily hassle shit that comes with it can be properly managed.
 

Cavallier

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Grovel? Me? lol :D I fought hard and almost committed murder. They hated my rotten guts.
Ha! Yeah, somebody has to shake them up sometimes.
 
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Grovel? Me? lol :D I fought hard and almost committed murder. They hated my rotten guts. They tried to preclude me (twice), invited me to meetings to convince me to quit (mere weeks before my final exam), instituted attendance regulations for the first time in their 60 year history because I refused to go to class (I was external student of the year twice - pharmacy isn't offered externally), failed me when by rights I had passed, and several years after I graduated, had classes about "proper behavior due to the actions of former students".

It was a hellish thing. And one of these days, when I see their 70 year old ass around the city somewhere, I am going to beat whatever teeth they have left out of their faces.

I even have the soundtrack for the massive beatdown picked out :twisteddevil: It is going to be fucken excellent

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2Eah_EGiDc
Conformists = asshole plague

Academia is made up of them.
 

just george

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Conformists = asshole plague

Academia is made up of them.
Yep. It's a monkey storm. Semi smart people who try to impress un smart people with bits of paper from other semi smart people. Meanwhile, very smart people roll their eyes at both groups.

I have zero respect for academia. One of my friends is now a doctor of psychology because he wrote a thesis proving that soldiers in Iraq who have IEDs explode near them tend to get more depressed, especially if their friends are killed in the explosion.

I mean, who would have thought that having a piece of your good friend Bob's femur embedded in your head might get you a bit down.

...they published his paper in a journal, said bravo, and all address him as "Dr.".

:ahh::ahh::ahh::ahh::ahh::ahh:
 

Pizzabeak

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I think all you who cannot bother to make contacts at uni are making a mistake. It's a lot easier to land first job if you get on with professors you like very well as well as helping your fellow class mates as much as you can.

I remember helping one guy I know landing a job because I knew a person who could employ him. Do you know how everything worked out? He pointed me to the right person when I needed help. So make an effort to help others to make your life easier. But only if you want to help them.
I'd like to say this might be one of the more important aspects of maybe even life in general (although I'm 21 so what do I really know). But from what I can tell it might be a good idea to try and find some circle unless you've been studying martial arts since childhood or can build lasers to shoot people with in the case of an emergency. That being said it seems partially true that in the end we are indeed truly alone and so you still must be able to provide for yourself; you shouldn't really rely on others for things.. It's basically the same, I can't help but think if we were all some type of animal (which we are) it'd be easy for the other ones to gang up and kill us for fun, which apparently wouldn't be that big of a deal in the long run. Could be some weird Wall Street darwinian thing taken way out of context.
And so I'd say easier said than done, if anything. Obviously ENFP & ENFJ would have no problem with it, with ENFP having more manipulative prowess therefore seeming to have some type of edge in that department. ENFJ are just good at attention based things which most people like and so are drawn toward. This is of course based off stereotypes, including the INTP inferior Fe ramification.
And so it seems like in most cases some reciprocation is expected, which might not even be obvious or realized at first. In attention based crowds they might get mad at you if you don't give them proper attention - which might not be given in the first place due to lack of interest but who's fault is it? You'll then be the black sheep and either it isn't the "right" relationship/circle for you or it will push you to "improve"... Something, which may or may not even be worth it. I'm guessing one can accept their role more or less, or just try and branch out but I'm not sure what the value of purposely seeking new people to connect with is. However, the classic notion of "best friends" might actually be possible in real life scenarios, again, which is why the 'black sheep' or wondering if a particular circle is the 'right' one for you was mentioned, that is if seeking something like that is important to you nowadays. The main issue seems to be being somewhat consistent with the giving.

I'm not actually sure how true any of this is.


I, personally, think it kind of sucks when it seems like there's a person you'd get along with but can't or don't say anything. I have been fortunate enough though, to have been approached at the beginning of this semester by this dude (might be ENTP, but this probably isn't relevant) who said he has seen me around a few different places lately and we were able to hang out around campus for ~5 hours, and talk about certain ideas, which was good... After those hours we both kinda got burnt out and had to leave each others company. We haven't "hung out" since what seems to be due to busy schedules. We've seen each other and have been kind enough to exchange a couple lines & catch up. He introduced me to a friend. I don't really see the purpose of not interacting with certain folks, unless you get to know them better and it turns out they're really annoying or something or hate you because they think you're lazy, selfish, and vain; etc. Is it worth putting up with? We've all seen those new age pictures on facebook with the text, "stop wasting time on people that don't value it" and whatnot so that's that, although I'd imagine disbanding from a relationship would take some heavy consideration if you've any humanity left. It could be likened to getting kicked out of a band or getting fired from some job.
And so, especially during university, I think one should try and meet people. Seems like a decent enough place to do so. I personally wasn't really able to meet anyone during junior college even though it seemed like there were a few people interested. The biggest thing is most people apparently like people so it wouldn't be that weird to make some sort of effort as most people might appreciate it at the very least. It's possible some of the prospects could have went as far as a simple additional friend on facebook but that's arguably better than nothing. From a certain perspective it makes sense, getting to know people... We're apparently all human; etc
Obviously there's some give and take. Probably can't go up to a football player and become best friends. Probably not that savvy, but you usually see football players and athletes hanging out together anyway.

But yeah, I think networking would be a good idea if only to get a job or something. What if you wanted to start a band, for example? So even speaking from an outsider's point of view it COULD be a decent idea, but if you wanted to lay low and relax then that's cool too. Mostly it seems people that want to "be someone" tend to do stuff like that.

"I find your cause interesting but I could never relate to it."

"... Victory, glory, honor... These ideals don't excite me a bit."

The best groups are maybe composed of individuals who can hold their own individually, so when they come together they are something to be reckoned with.
 

EditorOne

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They tell me I went to college, I don't remember.

However, knowing now what I didn't know then, I'd say the networking thing is at least as important and probably more important than learning a particular body of knowledge. It doesn't have to be odious networking, or ambition-related cultivation of the sons and daughters of movers and shakers, it can just be the natural relationships that develop from shared experiences. Just don't let them go after college. I was a surly, bruised, confused and rebellious "undiagnosed" INTP until my 40s; my default response to anyone who didn't understand me (eg, most of the world) was to withdraw into some variation of isolationist martyrdom and self-obfuscation. Had I simply stayed in contact with all the people I shared college with, I'd have stayed in contact with someone who became a President's legal adviser, another who became a university chancellor, a third who did a stint as secretary of Health and Human Services, and any number of folks who advanced in journalism and could have helped me at various times. "Help" as in telling me about interesting job opportunities or providing timely references or even talking me out of my self-imposed shell.

Don't overlook the value of natural, informal, organic networking. You really just don't know who is going to be in a position to help you down the road.
 

ahugenerd

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I avoided making friends and partied with people from high school. I dropped dozens of courses, failed one programming course, switched majors back and forth, transferred once, and now I'm finishing with a degree in philosophy from a world renowned math and engineering school. After finishing some post-grad certifications in programming and information systems, I am going to be very broke and very much in debt.

I did it for me. I liked it. I was good at it.
 

Puffy

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Generally speaking I had a good experience in uni. I think that it offers opportunities that you can choose to take or you can ignore. For me it provided a an escape from a small town filled with bigots, assholes, and everybody else who settled for rustling cows or working at the bar/grocery/gas station.

I think that you get out of it what you put into it. The first few years are simple basic intro classes that you can easily sail through or at least trudge through with a little application of will power. The more advanced classes were more interesting but my profs for those classes were also very self important or kind of insane. I had one prof who would make everyone read their essays out loud while he either berated them or praised them. It was horrible. Luckily I escaped with few scars and mostly was praised but I felt every acerbic word handed out to those less fortunate. I somehow survived three of his classes and admit to learning quite a bit from him but he was a monster.

Ultimately though, in my experience, I think you get out of it what you put into it. Find profs you respect and dig into whatever major you choose and it can be a positive experience. Fight the profs and don't connect to the study materials and you'll hate it.
I identify with most of what you've written in this thread. +1

My time at University was accompanied by many profound changes in me, and if not growth in understanding at least in creativity. The social side was downplayed as I eventually became disinterested in the general student culture on my site. But I had a lot of opportunities and I agree that what you take from it is to a large extent self-directed.

If I'm being completely honest I felt disinterested in a lot of the core study material throughout my whole time there as well. I still probably read more than most people on my course (I think I'm just inherently an auto-didact), but I had a weird divide in that I tended to do terribly on exams (for lack of interest in the module) but excellently on written essays due to how I'd find interesting ways to hybridise my own emerging interests with the module topics. Profs seemed to like and encourage this individual approach, and I was very grateful for the freedom I was allowed (my Sister in contrast has had no freedom on what she writes about -- I'd actually go nuts :phear:)

Learning to write effectively, learning the compromise between individual expression and external requirements (and consequently learning to find something interesting in any situation), managing original and independent projects, getting a sense of my potential creative capacity outside the context of my upbringing, meeting some interesting people and mapping a general sense of the humanities as they stand today. These were some of the most valuable things for me I think. :phear:
 

Cavallier

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Learning to write effectively, learning the compromise between individual expression and external requirements (and consequently learning to find something interesting in any situation), managing original and independent projects, getting a sense of my potential creative capacity outside the context of my upbringing, meeting some interesting people and mapping a general sense of the humanities as they stand today. These were some of the most valuable things for me I think. :phear:
This is very much true in my experience as well.
 
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