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Physics vs Biology major

martianamongyou

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Hello. I am kind of going through a very hard time deciding my major. :confused: I am a sophomore in college an am currently a physics major. I am very passionate about physics, specifically astrophysics. But I also feel that I have a passion for biology (specifically for evolutionary biology) that greatly rivals my passion for physics. I am debating changing my major to biology.

I am not so much concerned with getting a job right now. I am posting this on this forum because I hope that, posting amongst those with my same personality type, my great pursuit of knowledge will be understood. I would like to further my understanding of the universe we live in.

Sometimes I think physics can be short sighted and that is why I fall in love with the complexity of biology. I also like thinking about philosophical implications of biology as well.

Some of my more specific interests are: astrophysics, astrobiology, morality, free will, biochemistry, zoology, fish etc


Please help! I need to make up my mind soon.
 

Architect

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I am not so much concerned with getting a job right now.
You should be. You can study physics and biology on the side - easily - if you were, say, an engineer making a lot of money. The happiness of the older you is riding on the decisions you make now.

I would like to further my understanding of the universe we live in.
You won't get that from any University program in any case.
 

Vrecknidj

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I agree with Architect's advice. There are, however, probably good jobs available from either the physics or the biology pursuit. However, if your aim is knowledge, then get the job, make your income stream secure, and then get back to acquiring knowledge.

I have a graduate degree -- I've learned far, far more outside the university than inside it.
 

Pyropyro

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There's the field of biophysics. I took one of its courses and I believe it leans more on biology rather than physics (with lots of maths for added fun).

However, I don't know if the educational institutions in your area have biophysics courses or if there are jobs that's available for it. However, you might land a niche job if you do specialize in biophysics.
 

Architect

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I agree with Architect's advice. There are, however, probably good jobs available from either the physics or the biology pursuit.
It's hard to get a job with a Physics degree. Trust me, I've been there.
 

Base groove

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You should be. You can study physics and biology on the side - easily - if you were, say, an engineer making a lot of money. The happiness of the older you is riding on the decisions you make now.
You won't get that from any University program in any case.
I'm sorry, but what the fuck is this? Certainly not "INTP advice"...

It sounds like something an ISTJ would say.

Honestly, that was horrifically dismal, from an NP, not likely. If I had any doubts, now there are none. What about all this fantasy masturbation like:

"your mind is a blank book, fill in the pages as you go, sometimes leaving hundreds of blanks in between chapters as you spend your whole life acquiring knowledge"

Now it's become "you must follow my path so you don't have to face the horrors of discovering life for yourself"

I mean, inferior Ne much???
 

Blarraun

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Isn't it possible to connect astrophysics with biology? Planetology, evolutionary biology, astrobiology come to my mind.

If you like something then drop what you are doing and go for it, however consider well what you really like. Well not literally, or? :)

I'm sorry, but what the fuck is this? Certainly not "INTP advice"...

It sounds like something an ISTJ would say.

Honestly, that was horrifically dismal, from an NP, not likely. If I had any doubts, now there are none. What about all this fantasy masturbation like:

"your mind is a blank book, fill in the pages as you go, sometimes leaving hundreds of blanks in between chapters as you spend your whole life acquiring knowledge"

Now it's become "you must follow my path so you don't have to face the horrors of discovering life for yourself"

I mean, inferior Ne much???
In all modesty and my desire not to be protective, agressive or disproving.
Why would your action of denying someones possibly well earned life experience, and a judgement that projects from it, be any different than a generic ISXJ or any other judgemental bias scenario?

Is there some INTP advice model that pleases your senses and leaves you with positive responses, or some INTP behaviour that possibly makes you judgemental?
 
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It looks like you'd be as fascinated with agent-based modeling and game theory as I am. In systems terms ecology is the best model because it incorporates agency at its most easily observed level of organization, at the intersection of the hard sciences and the metaphysical. This is probably why biology appears more complex to you; it's easier to observe and you get a deeper perspective, especially with a general background in science/physics. You'll find that nearly all systemic processes in physics repeat in ecology; the models all transfer, just with different variables at different levels.

I mean.... agency and intelligence? Check this stuff out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3z_mdaQ5ac

My general philosophy is enjoy what you do. If you're having fun it isn't work. Got a preference for the outdoors in all its dirty glory and a utilitarian lean with a preference for public policy/people? Wildlife Biology. Like cutting into bodies? Medicine. Spend a lot of time in a museum/practically live in one? Evolution. Want a mix of dirty field work and modeling? Ecology.

Do you want to accumulate knowledge or disperse it? (<-Rhetorical). You only get paid for the latter.

Also... consider the prospects of a graduate degree. It allows you to become more specialized or form bridges between existing fields.
 

Base groove

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In all modesty and my desire not to be protective, agressive or disproving.
Why would your action of denying someones possibly well earned life experience, and a judgement that projects from it, be any different than a generic ISXJ or any other judgemental bias scenario?

Is there some INTP advice model that pleases your senses and leaves you with positive responses, or some INTP behaviour that possibly makes you judgemental?
Good point, regarding hypocrisy.

Actually, it's got *only a little to do with type. I just thought it was terrible advice.

The individual clearly stated his motives and intentions and the reply clearly ignored these criteria, in fact, he even indicated that the poster's future happiness depends on his current decisions. I'm saying, that is utter bullshit.

It was indicative of a subjective reality where cause-effect relationships between objects are well known and predictable, to the degree where the individual accepts them as absolute. In short, SiTe.

If you would like to know what I think Ne is about, it's about interacting with objective reality in real time to discover what potential lies behind every door, and every door therein, without focusing on subjective impressions of how your own personal life has played out. That's called ignoring possibilities.
 

doncarlzone

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Isn't it possible to connect astrophysics with biology? Planetology, evolutionary biology, astrobiology come to my mind.

If you like something then drop what you are doing and go for it, however consider well what you really like. Well not literally, or? :)


In all modesty and my desire not to be protective, agressive or disproving.
Why would your action of denying someones possibly well earned life experience, and a judgement that projects from it, be any different than a generic ISXJ or any other judgemental bias scenario?
Because it is not being put forward as advice anymore, it is being put forward as the only answer there is. Become a computer programmer and marry an INFJ. I'm sure many "INTPs" may very well find CS as the perfect path for them, but completely disregarding every other alternative is not a very nuanced view.
 

Blarraun

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Wouldn't that be a bit indicative of the inability of our INTP OP to use his Ne and Ti to select right answers from the pool of possibilities that arose? I find any person that questions capable of understanding the message, sometimes I adjust the degree of complexity, however I don't adjust my message.

I think that this thread was not designed to be NP exclusive and it is not without meaning that we sometimes make judgements or share our experiences here. The fact that you don't include IMO or methinks in every post doesn't mean you don't consider other options or did in the past.

That is true that leaving open options is important however, are you really that much taken aback at the statement that is directive?

I don't know why, but I see every statement as open and personal and I evaluate it by myself even if it belongs to someone respected or very likely to be right.

In other words, is it so important to have a certain tone to your opinions here? I agree I don't like dealing with final statements that are intended to hide other possibilities and obscure.
 

Architect

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I'm sorry, but what the fuck is this? Certainly not "INTP advice"...

It sounds like something an ISTJ would say.

Honestly, that was horrifically dismal, from an NP, not likely. If I had any doubts, now there are none. What about all this fantasy masturbation like:

"your mind is a blank book, fill in the pages as you go, sometimes leaving hundreds of blanks in between chapters as you spend your whole life acquiring knowledge"

Now it's become "you must follow my path so you don't have to face the horrors of discovering life for yourself"

I mean, inferior Ne much???
Let me guess, you're new here?
 

Architect

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Isn't it possible to connect astrophysics with biology? Planetology, evolutionary biology, astrobiology come to my mind.
Astrobiology. I only know of one person doing that professionally in the world (works for NASA), but I"m sure there's a few more around. Less than 5 probably.

In all modesty and my desire not to be protective, agressive or disproving.
Why would your action of denying someones possibly well earned life experience, and a judgement that projects from it, be any different than a generic ISXJ or any other judgemental bias scenario? ...
Drenth covers all this in his book, the search is the INTP "Maze Metaphor". I certainly went through it, having tried art, writing, physics, music, etc. While Drenth cautions against shortcuts, I think that with caution INTP's can find them. Consider Einstein for example, he never wasted decades in that kind of personal search.
 
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any reason why someone with a passion for physics couldn't make a profitable go of it as a structural engineer (buildings/ roads/ vehicles/ manufacturing/ industry)?

I.e. structural engineer by "occupation" but really a physicist in mind?

...I also feel that I have a passion for biology (specifically for evolutionary biology) that greatly rivals my passion for physics. I am debating changing my major to biology.
something like 50% of all those accepted to medical/ dental school are Biology majors. Doctors and Dentists make plenty of $$$ (have access to great "jobs" that are in high demand now and for at least the next 20 years) and you can explore the philosophies/ physics that intrigue you on the side.

I agree with the poster(s) above who have stated that you ought to consider "a job" first and "passions/ hobbies" pretty much very last. Don't forget about them but you don't want to be delivering pizza with a physics degree and having to work 60 hours/ week to make ends meet thereby leaving you with no time, effort, means to explore your interests/ hobbies.

think about that "job". Now. Don't waste time/ effort/ means not thinking about how you are going to eat in the future. If you are smart, that is.

...

I am not so much concerned with getting a job right now.
this is your worst idea possible. Way too many roadkill broadsided by reality a couple of years out of college. The only exceptions are those who are inheritors of healthy trust funds.
 
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I do actually know a Ph.D. student who was an astrophysicist for several years. He got bored with it and is becoming a forest ecologist. :D I think he entered grad school when he was 33-34?
 

Duxwing

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It's hard to get a job with a Physics degree. Trust me, I've been there.
Personal experience should not be hastily generalized because individuals can differently experience the same phenomenon, which may change with time: other physics majors may have more easily found work than you did, and physics majors' employment opportunities may have changed since you stopped seeking a physics job.

Whereas from objective experiential descriptions can be drawn principles that predict outcomes when used in different situations; analogously, describing your experience as if it were raw data could help us to derive laws of life.

-Duxwing
 

Architect

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Personal experience should not be hastily generalized because individuals can differently experience the same phenomenon, which may change with time: ...
It's not personal experience - I never looked for work as a Physicist. I did a re-tread as an engineer and so took that angle. It has nothing to do with me- it's very well known in the field that finding work is hard. Wasn't too bad up until the 70's or 80's - there was so much defense money getting poured into Physics because the Bomb ended the war. Now, in addition to universities pumping out PhD's like crazy, there aren't a lot of jobs. One reason the field has become so careerist, it's highly competitive.

I've had many discussions on the topic with professors and fellow grad students. That was some while ago, but my understanding is that its only gotten worse. However I wouldn't discourage one from becoming a Physicist if thats what they have to do*. But if you do you shouldn't have any illusions about what it takes.

* Verbatim advice I heard from a few professors when asked if one should go into physics. "Yes, if you have to". That is you wouldn't be happy otherwise.
 

Duxwing

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It's not personal experience - I never looked for work as a Physicist. I did a re-tread as an engineer and so took that angle. It has nothing to do with me- it's very well known in the field that finding work is hard. Wasn't too bad up until the 70's or 80's - there was so much defense money getting poured into Physics because the Bomb ended the war. Now, in addition to universities pumping out PhD's like crazy, there aren't a lot of jobs. One reason the field has become so careerist, it's highly competitive.
Are we discussing the likelihood of finding physics work after getting a physics degree, or the usefulness of a physics degree when seeking employment? I agree with the latter and not the former.

I've had many discussions on the topic with professors and fellow grad students. That was some while ago, but my understanding is that its only gotten worse. However I wouldn't discourage one from becoming a Physicist if thats what they have to do*. But if you do you shouldn't have any illusions about what it takes.
The definition of 'worse' depends on the above question because anyone who can speak and write barely coherent English and write sub-par code can find steady IT work where my dad works whereas the American Physics Institute writes that slightly more half of new physics Ph.D immediately found potentially permanent positions in 2009-10.

* Verbatim advice I heard from a few professors when asked if one should go into physics. "Yes, if you have to". That is you wouldn't be happy otherwise.
Tangentially: I unconsciously and despite other conscious knowledge projected that everyone approached choosing a major by finding the field without which they would be unhappy. Thanks for the enlightenment! :)

-Duxwing
 

Architect

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Are we discussing the likelihood of finding physics work after getting a physics degree, or the usefulness of a physics degree when seeking employment? I agree with the latter and not the former.
Both, however a physics degree isn't "not useful" - there are far worse things you could do with your time.

The definition of 'worse' depends on the above question because anyone who can speak and write barely coherent English and write sub-par code can find steady IT work where my dad works whereas the American Physics Institute writes that slightly more half of new physics Ph.D immediately found potentially permanent positions in 2009-10.
That's interesting, maybe it's better now. Let's analyze it though, first they use the word "potentially" which would mean say half actually get permanent jobs, and more than half means something like 53%. That means only 25% (50% of approximately 50%) get permanent jobs. This is reasonable, there is about that kind of turnover rate with retiring professors, and a few industry jobs.

It isn't a mystery what those 50% are doing either; they are post-docs. It's easy to get a post-doc, or usually several after a PhD. Professors use graduate students and post-docs as cheap labor. The post-docs are the best because they are the most experienced, and you can pay them more or less the same.

So putting it all together maybe things haven't changed that much.
 

Duxwing

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Both, however a physics degree isn't "not useful" - there are far worse things you could do with your time.
Drinking arsenic, leaping from cliffs, getting an art major...

That's interesting, maybe it's better now. Let's analyze it though, first they use the word "potentially" which would mean say half actually get permanent jobs, and more than half means something like 53%. That means only 25% (50% of approximately 50%) get permanent jobs. This is reasonable, there is about that kind of turnover rate with retiring professors, and a few industry jobs.
Why would half not find permanent work? :confused:

It isn't a mystery what those 50% are doing either; they are post-docs. It's easy to get a post-doc, or usually several after a PhD. Professors use graduate students and post-docs as cheap labor. The post-docs are the best because they are the most experienced, and you can pay them more or less the same.
Some of the other fifty percent change their sub-field of physics or find private employment.

So putting it all together maybe things haven't changed that much.
Recent advances in physics may open entirely new fields, and dark energy, dark matter, neutrinos, and the standard model need more study. I hope to find something interesting! :)

-Duxwing
 

Architect

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Why would half not find permanent work? :confused:
Having a PhD is a little poisonous in the private sector. Few companies like having PhD's, the (true or not) perception being that they expect a lot of money and can't get anything useful done. Those that do support PhD's reserve those spots for the tested and bloodied internal employees who worked their way up to it.

Recent advances in physics may open entirely new fields, and dark energy, dark matter, neutrinos, and the standard model need more study. I hope to find something interesting! :)
They may, I'm reluctant to think so though. Regardless you'll have an interesting time, it's all good, clean fun.
 

Duxwing

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Having a PhD is a little poisonous in the private sector. Few companies like having PhD's, the (true or not) perception being that they expect a lot of money and can't get anything useful done. Those that do support PhD's reserve those spots for the tested and bloodied internal employees who worked their way up to it.
Where my dad works, a physics Ph.D was hired from the outside because he was a physics Ph.D. I think that he ended up in research.

They may, I'm reluctant to think so though. Regardless you'll have an interesting time, it's all good, clean fun.
I hope that you are right on both counts: the completion of our knowledge of physics is more important than my entertainment. :)

-Duxwing
 
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I do actually know a Ph.D. student who was an astrophysicist for several years. He got bored with it and is becoming a forest ecologist. :D I think he entered grad school when he was 33-34?
I was going to say the same thing. He still has a side project I think he's working on combining them actually, or something. Something how many of the spatial patterns of stars are quite similar to spacing patterns in some sort of desert plants (Miriti's field)

I think 32 or 33 but no difference, really

Also, as for the discussion of post-docs between Archie and Dux; from my understanding, the last thing you want to be is a post-doc. It's around the time you get your Ph.D. when you start to realize you have nothing left to look forward to for a really long time.
 

Duxwing

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Also, as for the discussion of post-docs between Archie and Dux; from my understanding, the last thing you want to be is a post-doc. It's around the time you get your Ph.D. when you start to realize you have nothing left to look forward to for a really long time.
Are you referring to the life of a post-doc, or to that of any new Ph.D?

-Duxwing
 

Duxwing

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Well, aren't they one and the same? :D

The former.
Perhaps "nothing to look forward to" goes too far. Love, learning, and adventure await us all--especially in the first world.

-Duxwing
 
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Perhaps "nothing to look forward to" goes too far. Love, learning, and adventure await us all--especially in the first world.

-Duxwing
Obviously, Dux. The point I was trying to make is that post-docs are overworked and underpaid - at least the ones I know (Biology).

To keep this post in reference to the OP, from what I've heard, it's difficult to do much with a Physics degree. Ultimately, the goal is to be able to support yourself, and if you want a family, to support them too. I know personally that biology if an entertaining subject, and that there are a plethora of relevant jobs available, even to those who don't go on to get a Ph.D or Master's.

Biology also seems to be more broadly applicable (although Physics probably is, too).
 

Duxwing

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Obviously, Dux. The point I was trying to make is that post-docs are overworked and underpaid - at least the ones I know (Biology).
Yikes.

To keep this post in reference to the OP, from what I've heard, it's difficult to do much with a Physics degree. Ultimately, the goal is to be able to support yourself, and if you want a family, to support them too. I know personally that biology if an entertaining subject, and that there are a plethora of relevant jobs available, even to those who don't go on to get a Ph.D or Master's.
Starting salaries at potentially permanent positions are ~$90,000, and one only need be hired once provided that the job itself remains.

Biology also seems to be more broadly applicable (although Physics probably is, too).
Mathematics, Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Computer Engineering, Robotics, Military Intelligence, Investing: a physics degree can take you far.

-Ducxwing
 
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Starting salaries at potentially permanent positions are ~$90,000, and one only need be hired once provided that the job itself remains.
And of course, every person that graduates with a physics degree (or anything else, for that matter) gets a starting salary of $90,000. :rolleyes:

C'mon Dux, let's be real...

Given the state of our economy, (or not, the point remains regardless) it's difficult for anyone to find employment, let alone a stable career path directly after graduating, and certainly not such a high number (seems to be ~$40,000 more per year than the average individual income for males over 25 with a bachelor's).

Sure, there are great opportunities, but for your typical graduate? You're not that naive, are you, Dux?

Mathematics, Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Computer Engineering, Robotics, Military Intelligence, Investing: a physics degree can take you far.
It's my understanding that most people that go into engineering (which I was going to mention until I realized this) get engineering degrees, either from a 4-year or 2-year program. Sure, physics is applicable - but totally unnecessary; most civil or mechanical engineers, (as well as computer scientists or engineers) don't need a 4-year degree to find a job. Even when they do get one, it's labelled engineering (which of course is physics, but it's not a physics degree).

OP doesn't seem like he wants to be an engineer anyway:

I would like to further my understanding of the universe we live in
 

Duxwing

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And of course, every person that graduates with a physics degree (or anything else, for that matter) gets a starting salary of $90,000. :rolleyes:
Strawman. I said (in many words) that $90,000 is the average annual entry-level salary of the potentially permanent positions that graduating physics students achieve, and that half of physics students achieve these positions; I omitted the salary metric because I assumed that everyone would understand that salary metrics are of central tendency, and I apologize for your confusion.

C'mon Dux, let's be real...
Emotionally, saying "let's be realistic" assumes away the question because it implies that someone is being unrealistic.

Given the state of our economy, (or not, the point remains regardless) it's difficult for anyone to find employment, let alone a stable career path directly after graduating, and certainly not such a high number (seems to be ~$40,000 more per year than the average individual income for males over 25 with a bachelor's).
Those statistics are irrelevant because we are discussing Ph.D students, not bachelors students, and I have already mentioned that only slightly more than half of Physics Ph.D graduates immediately find potentially permanent positions.

If have not read my earlier posts on this subject in this thread, then please read them because I have addressed these concerns.

Sure, there are great opportunities, but for your typical graduate? You're not that naive, are you, Dux?
I'm hardly being naive, and your asserting my naïveté is logically irrelevant, implicitly assumes that I am wrong, and hurts my feelings. It also contradicts reality because my initial statement was based on the following empirical findings by the American Physics Society: http://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201208/phdjobs.cfm

It's my understanding that most people that go into engineering (which I was going to mention until I realized this) get engineering degrees, either from a 4-year or 2-year program. Sure, physics is applicable - but totally unnecessary; most civil or mechanical engineers, (as well as computer scientists or engineers) don't need a 4-year degree to find a job. Even when they do get one, it's labelled engineering (which of course is physics, but it's not a physics degree).
Physics, mathematics, and computer science credits from a Physics Ph.D can transfer, and if they don't, then their respective classes will be a breeze. One can also be a consultant without a degree.

OP doesn't seem like he wants to be an engineer anyway:

He may so change his mind as Architect did, and as the alternatives, so the opportunity.

-Duxwing
 
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First and foremost, want to address this:
Those statistics are irrelevant because we are discussing Ph.D students, not bachelors students, and I have already mentioned that only slightly more than half of Physics Ph.D graduates immediately find potentially permanent positions.
OP is not talking about a Ph.D. He is talking about an undergraduate education. So was I. I specifically noted that I was not addressing people with doctorates; the irrelevant data came from you, not from me. I wouldn't have even said that if you had specified , which you did not:

Strawman. I said (in many words) that $90,000 is the average annual entry-level salary of the potentially permanent positions that graduating physics students achieve, and that half of physics students achieve these positions; I omitted the salary metric because I assumed that everyone would understand that salary metrics are of central tendency, and I apologize for your confusion.
Further, you're misinterpreting the data (or presenting it in a way that is misleading).

According to your reference, http://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201208/phdjobs.cfm, 30% of doctorates accept potentially permanent positions:
30 percent of newly minted PhDs are accepting potentially permanent positions
But of those 30 percent, 57% were in the private sector, which indeed had the median salary of 90,000:
The majority of these potentially permanent positions were in the private sector, about 57 percent,
In all, 17% of employed "newly minted PhDs" have a median starting income of $90,000.

Despite your numbers not being relevant to what I was talking about anyway, (we need to keep the discussion close to the OP [assuming he's not currently considering graduate school, since he doesn't even know what he wants to major in]) the majority of graduated students (with PhDs) work as post-docs, where the salary is significantly lower.
Emotionally, saying "let's be realistic" assumes away the question because it implies that someone is being unrealistic.
Saying "let's be real" implied that you were being overly optimistic; when considering one's potential futures, it's important that all possibilities are considered. Giving the highest estimates without noting the most frequent (and subsequently much lower) estimates can give a false sense of hope or create a misinformed individual (intentionally or not), especially for someone who isn't even in graduate school to begin with, and is unsure of what they want to do. In short, it's being unrealistic.

Those statistics are irrelevant because we are discussing Ph.D students, not bachelors students, and I have already mentioned that only slightly more than half of Physics Ph.D graduates immediately find potentially permanent positions.
57% of 30%.

Physics, mathematics, and computer science credits from a Physics Ph.D can transfer, and if they don't, then their respective classes will be a breeze. One can also be a consultant without a degree.
Sure, but it's not the same thing. Moot point either way; I'm not arguing for anything here.

He may so change his mind as Architect did, and as the alternatives, so the opportunity.

-Duxwing
Fair enough.
 
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I was in your position about 2 weeks ago, considering whether I should major in biology or physics. Specifically, what I really wanted was to pursue some field of study that could bring me closer to "answers of life". But just a few months ago, I had read an article which reported Biology majors ranking among the highest of the unemployed. This disappointed me and caused me to reconstruct my entire career path. I'm now majoring in Engineering at a community college and hoping to transfer to a university to study for an undergrad degree in Bioengineering. I chose that major because it's a combination of biology and engineering, subjects which both interest me.


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I had read an article which reported Biology majors ranking among the highest of the unemployed.
Just to clarify: This is true of biology majors with the general title "Biology," the reason being because the coursework is intentionally generalized with the goal of preparing students for med school or another advanced degree. It's not intended to be a reliable endpoint, which is... poorly communicated on the part of universities for likely several reasons. In the field of the biological sciences as a whole, however, it's not the case.

Otherwise I definitely agree with your choice of Bioengineering. Just the right amount of specialty and application.
 
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It's not intended to be a reliable endpoint, which is... poorly communicated on the part of universities for likely several reasons. In the field of the biological sciences as a whole, however, it's not the case.
This^^

It really should be communicated better. I got lucky, and decided before I realized I needed to go that I wanted to go.
 

WALKYRIA

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biology--> than med school--->money and prestige dude !


Am sorry with me being annoying abot med school but I'm fed up with being one of the sole INTP 5W4 in medecine.. shit. I think the proportion of INTP 5W4 in med students is even lower than in real life? PLenty of annoying hardworking people in it !

We need some strong, solid, balanced, paradigm changing INTP 5W4 in here... pleazz !
 

Valentas

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I was in med school. Then I found that I don't want to be a doctor. So, I dropped out of medicine and went for CS. It leaves me time to learn other subjects too. Currently, it's biochemistry. :D Also, I don't care about money and prestige. I am satisfied with a prospect of living on above average income and pursuing other interests in my spare time. Becoming doctor is a trap. Once you're one, it is hard to decide that you want to get the hell out of medicine after some time. And that time will be in your 30s, almost 40s maybe and it will be too late to pursue something else. Well, not for committed people. But for most, it's a job for life. And I don't want to be stuck in job for life. No matter how well-paid it is. :)
 

Architect

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I was in med school. Then I found that I don't want to be a doctor. So, I dropped out of medicine and went for CS. It leaves me time to learn other subjects too. Currently, it's biochemistry. :D Also, I don't care about money and prestige. I am satisfied with a prospect of living on above average income and pursuing other interests in my spare time. Becoming doctor is a trap. Once you're one, it is hard to decide that you want to get the hell out of medicine after some time. And that time will be in your 30s, almost 40s maybe and it will be too late to pursue something else. Well, not for committed people. But for most, it's a job for life. And I don't want to be stuck in job for life. No matter how well-paid it is. :)
Yeah I've known a lot of doctors and am always noticing that the life they live would have been toxic for me. Basically you're a people manager and a service provider, just one with a lot of prestige and money is all. Not worth it at any price.
 

WALKYRIA

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U guys are right... I think Kersey and AJ Drenth wrote that a major trap for young INTPs was into thinking they are Fe dominant or Fe secondary... and going for Fe jobs( Medecine, social work,..Etc) while later realizing they were completely misled.

That's indeed a major trap for INTPs, especially for the softer, sensitive ones.

But you should keep the recurrent "underachieving problem of INTPs" in mind... Many talented people( especially smart people with INTP personality type ) never achieve their full potential for various reasons.... and the feeling of underachievement or unfulfilled potential is the worst.( depression,.etc)
I'm just saying...


PS/ Pure Medicine is indeed not a great job for INTPs.... Psychiatry is another thing. Studies have shown that almost all INTPs in medicine systematically go into psychiatry.(I mean psychiatry is like the perfect INTP job(little to no stress, little hours/ great money, analyzing people, doing research, writing books, intellectual people..Etc) , but arriving there is something else..
 
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