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What songs are you listening to? /III/

TheScornedReflex

(Per) Version of a truth.
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Tomorrow 2:22 AM
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onesteptwostep

The Lance of Longinus
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"Music is, then, the medium for that species of the immediate which, qualified spiritually, is specified as lying outside spirit. Naturally, music can express much else, but this is its absolute object." -Soren Kierkegaard
 

Artsu Tharaz

The Lamb
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ALL HAIL KING GLEN BENTON


666 AAIIIIEEEEE
 

Puffy

Mindless serf
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Today 1:22 PM
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Infected
Listening to music is a leisure to me. It enhances my life and I've always gotten a lot of enjoyment out of it but I'm unsure if it's really changed me much as a person. It feels more like as my character has developed my taste in music has also broadened and changed to reflect that. The exception to this I'd make is participating in music, which I feel has been and still is changing me in a healthy way.

This is the only album that springs to me that I feel listening to had a genuine affect on changing my life. When I first listened to it 12 years ago it felt like complete trash. But as I'd already bought it I thought I should make the most of the purchase. It was around about the 5th or 6th listen that it all fell into place to me and revealed this alien landscape with its own eccentric language that I just intuitively understood and felt at home with.

There was something about having this album that only I (in the context of people I knew at the time) could see beauty in that really spoke to me and how deeply alienated I felt at the time. People in my Christian community of the time judged it as "demon possessed", which to me felt like they were calling me "demon possessed" and asking I suppress my natural evil preferences. It played a big part in me eventually leaving the religion, which was a major developmental catalyst.

These days I don't really get the alienation vibe listening to it. It more reminds me of the importance of playing your own tune without fear of rejection or how it might sound to others. It's still in my top 10 list 12 years later.

 

DingusLord

Jump thrice
Local time
Today 7:22 AM
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40
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Ductaping Pandora's Box
Listening to music is a leisure to me. It enhances my life and I've always gotten a lot of enjoyment out of it but I'm unsure if it's really changed me much as a person. It feels more like as my character has developed my taste in music has also broadened and changed to reflect that. The exception to this I'd make is participating in music, which I feel has been and still is changing me in a healthy way.

This is the only album that springs to me that I feel listening to had a genuine affect on changing my life. When I first listened to it 12 years ago it felt like complete trash. But as I'd already bought it I thought I should make the most of the purchase. It was around about the 5th or 6th listen that it all fell into place to me and revealed this alien landscape with its own eccentric language that I just intuitively understood and felt at home with.

There was something about having this album that only I (in the context of people I knew at the time) could see beauty in that really spoke to me and how deeply alienated I felt at the time. People in my Christian community of the time judged it as "demon possessed", which to me felt like they were calling me "demon possessed" and asking I suppress my natural evil preferences. It played a big part in me eventually leaving the religion, which was a major developmental catalyst.

These days I don't really get the alienation vibe listening to it. It more reminds me of the importance of playing your own tune without fear of rejection or how it might sound to others. It's still in my top 10 list 12 years later.

This resonates very much. I had a similar general religious experience.

Also a somewhat parallel musical one. Upon hearing the Beach Boys for the first time after being in a school band ensemble for a significant period of time, I marveled at the nuance not found in much of any mainstream music. I then spent a few month phase listening to all Brian Wilson had to offer. It was as if a great filter had been placed between my ears and brain.

The first time I listened to Pet Sounds on vinyl I dropped 7 tears.

I had begun to understand the difference between music made exclusively for money, and that made for passion.

To the point that the cognitive dissonance I encounter while listening to jarringly soulless music is near painful.

It's a strange and heartening thing when an artist is paid to make something mundane, and they just create a masterpiece out of nowhere, and in contrast to the funder's intent.
Example: Cowboy Bebop.

Anyways, stay gold Puffyboy.

 

crippli

disturbed
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Jan 15, 2008
Messages
1,767
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Listening to music is a leisure to me. It enhances my life and I've always gotten a lot of enjoyment out of it but I'm unsure if it's really changed me much as a person. It feels more like as my character has developed my taste in music has also broadened and changed to reflect that. The exception to this I'd make is participating in music, which I feel has been and still is changing me in a healthy way.

This is the only album that springs to me that I feel listening to had a genuine affect on changing my life. When I first listened to it 12 years ago it felt like complete trash. But as I'd already bought it I thought I should make the most of the purchase. It was around about the 5th or 6th listen that it all fell into place to me and revealed this alien landscape with its own eccentric language that I just intuitively understood and felt at home with.

There was something about having this album that only I (in the context of people I knew at the time) could see beauty in that really spoke to me and how deeply alienated I felt at the time. People in my Christian community of the time judged it as "demon possessed", which to me felt like they were calling me "demon possessed" and asking I suppress my natural evil preferences. It played a big part in me eventually leaving the religion, which was a major developmental catalyst.

These days I don't really get the alienation vibe listening to it. It more reminds me of the importance of playing your own tune without fear of rejection or how it might sound to others. It's still in my top 10 list 12 years later.

Do I have to listen 5-6 times to understand this?
 

Puffy

Mindless serf
Local time
Today 1:22 PM
Joined
Nov 7, 2009
Messages
3,023
-->
Location
Infected
Listening to music is a leisure to me. It enhances my life and I've always gotten a lot of enjoyment out of it but I'm unsure if it's really changed me much as a person. It feels more like as my character has developed my taste in music has also broadened and changed to reflect that. The exception to this I'd make is participating in music, which I feel has been and still is changing me in a healthy way.

This is the only album that springs to me that I feel listening to had a genuine affect on changing my life. When I first listened to it 12 years ago it felt like complete trash. But as I'd already bought it I thought I should make the most of the purchase. It was around about the 5th or 6th listen that it all fell into place to me and revealed this alien landscape with its own eccentric language that I just intuitively understood and felt at home with.

There was something about having this album that only I (in the context of people I knew at the time) could see beauty in that really spoke to me and how deeply alienated I felt at the time. People in my Christian community of the time judged it as "demon possessed", which to me felt like they were calling me "demon possessed" and asking I suppress my natural evil preferences. It played a big part in me eventually leaving the religion, which was a major developmental catalyst.

These days I don't really get the alienation vibe listening to it. It more reminds me of the importance of playing your own tune without fear of rejection or how it might sound to others. It's still in my top 10 list 12 years later.

Do I have to listen 5-6 times to understand this?
Hah, probably. Hair Pie is one of the harder tracks on the album, it’d be easier to listen to the more accessible tracks like “My human gets me blues”, “Steal softly thru snow” or “Veteran’s day poppy”. Once you ‘understand’ those as you say the harder ones start to fall into place.

A big part of what makes this album confusing at first is the polyrhythms. I.e it sounds at first like the 3 guitar parts are all playing different songs. The key is to listen to the drummer who brings all the different rhythms together and essentially directs the music.
 
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